Damn... dropped it

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Bounced my favorite Lie Nielsen low angle (brass) block plane off the concrete floor. Put a wonderful divit on the leading edge that will have to be filed off becuase it actually impengies on the flat face maybe a 1/16th. I guess I finally get to use that granite block and do some lapping this weekend. I use that little plane almost every day I am in the shop.
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On 1/9/2013 11:52 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

floor. Put a wonderful divit on the leading edge that will have to be filed off becuase it actually impengies on the flat face maybe a 1/16th. I guess I finally get to use that granite block and do some lapping this weekend. I use that little plane almost every day I am in the shop.

That's why I put commercial floor tiling in. In most cases my floor gets the divot removed. not the tool.
I realize your shop is much bigger and too costly to tile, but maybe work areas could get a ply underlayment.
Sorry for your loss.
BTW that tiling didn't help my Makita LS1013 from it's demise.. when I dropped it down the stairs to the basement. Destroyed the casting, the bars... total wreck.. and boy do I miss that Miter saw.. Huge table, smooth glide. I have not purchased another yet. Looking too, but the Kapex is too much... The glide looks nice, but is missing a laser.. not that the laser is that valuable for fine work, but for rough cutting lumber it would be nice.
--
Jeff

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I know your pain... My L-N 7 got knocked off the bench during a Boy Scout project. Both the toe and heel suffered the same fate as your low angle... It hit hard enough that the iron and cap popped loose too. I have not had the heart to deal with it yet. The bench wasn't actually in use at the time but while materials were being moved around it got swept off the bench by materials. I can only blame myself for not moving the tools off the bench to a safer location... As a co-worker was fond of saying, "no good deed goes unpunished." ;~)
John
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On 1/9/2013 12:29 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Throughout 99% of the long history of planes, when they were indeed the indispensable, exalted king tool of the wood shop, there was no such thing as a concrete floor, or a 'garage shop' with one ... ;)
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I can only blame myself for not moving the tools off the bench to a safer location... As a co-worker was fond of saying, "no good deed goes unpunished." ;~) John
Yeah, one of the first shops I worked in had a rule that no power tool could be left on a bench. Anything with a cord had to left on the floor or stored on a shelf. They were fanatical about it. You could get fired for leaving any power tool on a bench.
I have always placed chisels far from any edge and used to be as careful with my planes. Only have to knock a chisel once and try to catch it... ouch. Just let it fall is safer but a bad angle and it is lots o grinding.
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I'm generally much more careful about things like this... but due to the project the shop was very cluttered and there wasn't much room to maneuver.
I recall that during one of my son's projects he accidently stabbed the Record vice with my 1/2" chisel and broke a corner off the edge. A few days later he dropped it and broke the other corner off. The chisel lost about 1/4" in length due to those two incidents. Oh well... I'd rather have the boys learning and doing than spend much time worrying about the infrequent accidental damage to my tools.
John
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On 1/9/2013 2:19 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

location... As a co-worker was fond of saying, "no good deed goes unpunished." ;~) John

be left on a bench. Anything with a cord had to left on the floor or stored on a shelf. They were fanatical about it. You could get fired for leaving any power tool on a bench.

my planes. Only have to knock a chisel once and try to catch it... ouch. Just let it fall is safer but a bad angle and it is lots o grinding.

Has any one tried to place a raised lip around their work bench to keep things from accidentally rolling off?
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On 1/9/2013 3:14 PM, knuttle wrote:

No way in hell that will work, as it effectively emasculates the work bench for most woodworking tasks that they're designed for.
That said, many woodworking benches do have a tool "well" built into the surface that will certainly help keep an expensive tool from hitting a concrete floor.
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On 1/9/2013 3:23 PM, Swingman wrote:

I detest woodworking blogs with a passion, but case in point:
http://www.rpwoodwork.com/blog/2011/01/18/the-workbench-tool-well /
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> Has any one tried to place a raised lip around their work bench to keep things from accidentally rolling off?
Wouldn't work for me. I clamp stuff down to the table as a pretty standard course of work. Most every assembly. I do have one small section where I have 2 vertical miter bar channels in the side of the table (it has a hard facia about 5" deep) and a board with locking knobs so I can slide it up and lock it to create an indexing edge when I want to line up items for assembly. Not sure the descripton is understandable but I use it quite often.
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On 1/9/2013 4:14 PM, knuttle wrote:

Why would you do that? How would you clamp something to your bench and overhang the edge?
How would that stop something from going over. Imagine a 1/8 inch lip, if you pushed enough the plane would roll over and go over anyway. Same with a 1/2 lip. So what would be the point.
Wells are used on some benches. That might have helped, but not guaranteed.
--
Jeff

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My main bench was designed with clamping in mind. There's no way it would work. However, on my secondary bench (mitersaw table), I've considered adding a back so tools don't fall off the back.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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SonomaProducts.com wrote the following on 1/9/2013 2:19 PM (ET):

location... As a co-worker was fond of saying, "no good deed goes unpunished." ;~) John

be left on a bench. Anything with a cord had to left on the floor or stored on a shelf. They were fanatical about it. You could get fired for leaving any power tool on a bench.

my planes. Only have to knock a chisel once and try to catch it... ouch. Just let it fall is safer but a bad angle and it is lots o grinding.
If I see it start to fall, I instinctively swing my foot under it to either catch it before it hits the floor or lessen the height before hitting. I gotta remember not to do that with tools that are more than a few pounds in weight.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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You'd be surprised how much a "light weight" 12" Jourgeson F-clamp smarts when it hits your foot.
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That would suggest safety shoes with toe, metatarsal and sole protection thrown in for good measure.
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On Wed, 9 Jan 2013 13:29:19 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

Did you write to Boy Scout Corporate HQ to see if their insurance would cover it? LNs ain't cheap.
-- I started out with nothing and I still have most of it left! --anon
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This is a "donation..." ;~)
As it was, the Unit put up about half the money for materials and a friend of mine, whom wishes to remain anonymous, put up the other half. I supplied the labor, my shop, electric, and tool maintenance and repair. Wouldn't you know it... during that project the magnetic switch on my cabinet saw died, the lower tire on my bandsaw broke (apparently at the seam), a nail embedded in the rough cut pine damaged a bunch of teeth on one of my Forrest blades, and the plane hit the floor. It is what it is... the boys benefited, the switch and tire probably would have failed on the next project anyway and that isn't the first time I've hit something embedded in virgin rough cut and I doubt if it will be the last.
John
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"John Grossbohlin" wrote in message wrote:

This is a "donation..." ;~)
As it was, the Unit put up about half the money for materials and a friend of mine, whom wishes to remain anonymous, put up the other half. I supplied the labor, my shop, electric, and tool maintenance and repair. Wouldn't you know it... during that project the magnetic switch on my cabinet saw died, the lower tire on my bandsaw broke (apparently at the seam), a nail embedded in the rough cut pine damaged a bunch of teeth on one of my Forrest blades, and the plane hit the floor. It is what it is... the boys benefited, the switch and tire probably would have failed on the next project anyway and that isn't the first time I've hit something embedded in virgin rough cut and I doubt if it will be the last.
John
John.... Look at it this way. If you did not have any bad luck, you would not have any luck at all. :>) Sorry, had to say it. ww
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On 1/9/2013 4:15 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

John, didn't you just replace that switch not too long ago, or needed info on wiring it???
John, seems like too many things went wrong during their time there. Was there a little devil in the group?
Let's see Forrest blade 134 Switch 50-200 Plane $425 New tire $30
you had a very expensive day....
--
Jeff

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"woodchucker" wrote in message

The project took me about 220 hours spread over a number of months... Much of it I worked on alone. It's the same switch as discussed about a year ago. During the project before that it was giving me grief. Once I got into this project it was worse. After cleaning it with contact cleaner, adjusting it, etc. it still didn't work so I replaced it. The plane accident happened near the end of the project.
As I recall the switch was $150 so yes it was an expensive project. However, the tire and switch failures during the project were a coincidence. They could have failed on the next project or the project after that... so they don't count against the project! I believe I can fix the plane to full function even if it doesn't have that "factory" look any more.
John
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