Dadoo question

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I am trying to decide either to make dadoos with a router or with a table saw. I know that they make router bits designed to match the true sixe of plywood.
I have never worked with dadoos before. I have both 1/4 and 1/2 inch routers, which would be better? Do it in one pass or multiple working down to the final depth?
If a table saw, what size blade would I get for my 10" table say?
Thanks
Ted
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http://www.infinitytools.com/prodinfo.asp?number=PDJ%2D100
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I am trying to decide either to make dadoos with a router or with a table saw. I know that they make router bits designed to match the true sixe of plywood.
I have never worked with dadoos before. I have both 1/4 and 1/2 inch routers, which would be better? Do it in one pass or multiple working down the final depth? If a table saw, what size blade would I get for my 10" table say?
Thanks
Ted
I use a guide I made for the job http://www.flickr.com/photos/mdinep/2526517102 /
You can see that the guide is good for two different DeWalt routers (the 618 and the 621)
Max
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Ted, My suggestion is to do them on the table saw, but you'll need a stacked dado set that cuts a flat bottom. The problem I've found with "plywood-sized" router bits is that they aren't....you know...plywood-sized. The real problem is that plywood isn't plywood-sized, at least not what I find at my hardwood lumber store. The plywood bits I've seen are 1/32" undersized from the nominal plywood size. Hell, I can't get plywood that's only 1/16" undersize. What I do in this situation is measure the plywood thickness, set up my stacked dado set and cut a test in the same material I'll be using, test the fit, and adjust as needed. \\
Mine is an 8". The dado set, that is.
todd
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Thanks to everyone for your answers. My first project for this will be "cabinets" for a closet organizer system. I think that I will start with a router setup due to all the different setups for each pass.
Ted

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There is one thing to consider when making dados. A router bit is a fixed size and it's sometimes a pain to have to do repeat cuts to sneak up on the exact width of dado slot that you need. A dado blade for a table saw however, can be configured to the exact size needed, so you adjust to what you want and then you can do many repeat cuts much faster.
The good scenario when using routers is if you have a bit that cuts the exact size of dado that you need from the get go.
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wrote in message

I've done it both ways and I find it easier, when necessary, to place a thin strip of material (masking tape, UHMW plastic strip, etc.) along side my routing guide than it is to mount a dado blade and remove and remount it to keep adding (or subtracting) shims to get the correct width. But then I have a large assortment of router bits and I seldom have to resort to adding anything to the guide.
There's a good plan from "Shop Notes" for a dado jig that would work even better than my method.
Max
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"either to make dadoos with a router or with a table saw . . . "is that they aren't....you know...plywood-sized. ...
There is a technique used that kills this bird and on other off on the horizon - cutting a rabbit into the edge of the plywood to bring it to a "standard" thickness and cutting the dado in the mating piece to match.
This saves you the expense of a "Plywood-sized" router bit (set?) and has the advantage of hiding the joint nicely. Sorry I couldn't come up with a link for youor even a "name" for the approach.
Of course, as with most all who post here, your post was bereft of many of the details you were privy to in considering the alternatives. How large are the pieces you will be working with? Are you building shop shelves of heirloom cabinetry - if you are in prison, is it for you or the guards or your daddy?
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This is exactly how I made my kitchen cabinets. I rabbeted the front edge of the plywood to fit a mating dado in my face frames. I used a router bit set from Marc Sommerfeld.
todd
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This will be my first big project. I will be making a closet system for myself. I was thinking of using a rabit on the back for a back panel to fit in. I was thinking of using dados for the permanent shelf's.
Ted

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"Ted" wrote:

It depends; however, a stacked dado on a table saw offers more flexibility.
Freud will have an 8" stacked dado for use on a 10" table saw for around $200.
There are others of similar or better quality, I just happen to have the Freud.
When a stacked dado doesn't do the job, time to look at the router.
Lew
Lew
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Personal preference. I used to do them with a router, I even designed a router dado jig that does indeed make the perfect sized dado. You use the actual material that will fit into the dado to set the jig up. Width does not matter. You might be able to find the design plans on the internet if you look for "Leon's dado jig". Now however I typically use the stacked dado set on the TS if making more than 1 dado. The TS stacked dado takes more time to set up than my jig but after it is set up multiple dado's of the same size are much faster.
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I did a search and every instance all link back to http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/dado.html which is a bad link. I would love to see it.
Ted

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I can send you a pdf file by e-mail if you like. It is a basic CAD drawing. If you are still interested I can give you some details to explain the concept of how it works.

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" look for "Leon's dado jig"."
Was "up" on Desoto's site, but not today. Instead, I found the three- legged sawhorses - worth a look. http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/SawHorse /
Here's one that's simple for smaller stock: http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip031205wb-closer.html
And a picture of another approach - to get exact width of receiving stock:
http://images.meredith.com/wood/images/a_343_1_3.gif
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

It was there for quite a while, and was deleted (with a /lot/ of other files) when it seemed appropriate.
There's an explanation at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Misc.html
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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I hope you considered me a contributor rather than an offender. Either way I did and do appreciate your site. Thank you again.
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Leon wrote:

You're welcome. It's difficult not to consider you a contributor since one of the web pages hit most frequently was that with your photos, although I think your inventiveness and generosity were seriously under-appreciated. At this point I'm of the opinion that those who want to avail themselves of your generosity can ask "please" and say "thank you" to you directly.
The only thing I found offensive was the attitude that I didn't have the right to charge for products that the complainers weren't capable of producing (or even imagining) without my showing the way. 'Nuff said - end rant.
Pax.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Ted wrote:

Both! Generally, the table saw is faster and easier, but, if you want to cut a dado on the ends of 8' book self sides, it's easier on a router or a radial arm saw.

You'll figure that out yourself after you cut a couple. Depends on size, wood, cutter and so on.

Dado sets are generally smaller than your regular 10" blades. dado's are always shallow cuts not 3 inches deep so no need for a 10" dado set. The width is easy to adjust in stacked dado's simply by putting paper "washers" for spacers between the blades to adjust the cut. If you don't own a dado set, I would recommend you stay away for the adjustable wobble things, and get a nice standard stacked dado set.
--
Jack
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And, in preference to the suggested paper ships above, I like Lee Valley's plastic dado shims that have a slot cut in them so one doesn't have to remove the arbour nut completely to add or remove shims.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p0063&cat=1,41080,51225&ap=1
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