Dado Cuts w/o Dado Blade

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I have a 10-year old B & D table saw. It appears that the arbor is too short to add a dado blade. I don't really have the space or budget for a new saw now.
I'd like to build some bookshelves, and make dados in the side rails for the shelves. I just finished making a bookshelf where I cut the dados with a backsaw and straight-edge clamped to the work. It worked well, but getting uniform depth on the cuts was difficult.
Looking for suggestions on how to cut accurate dados with a dado blade. For the dados close to the end of the work, I was thinking I could clamp 2 shelf-size boards to the fence before the blade, and use the miter to cut. Then remove one of the boards and cut again.
Is there a better way?
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blade.
This should read:
Looking for suggestions on how to cut accurate dados _without_ a dado blade.
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

Router is one way.
Certainly possible to do it just like w/ a dado set and "nibble" the center out although slower and need more cleanup.
I guess before specific recommendation, what's the material, what size is it and what size dado? Also, what do you have for tools other than not having a dado set?
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It is oak, and the shelves are 1 by. Yes, I do have a router and have considered that. Not sure how easy it would be to plow through oak, though.
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What do you mean, "not sure how easy it would be to plow through oak"?? Is your router underpowered, and your bits are worn out from milling a few too many feet of Ipe? :)
Dave
Buck Turgidson wrote:

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With a fresh straight cutting bit, no problem at all. The router is your friend making dado joints.
Find a posting from Leon on his "spiffy dado jig"... using Google groups.
Buck Turgidson wrote:

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In article

I tried that and the ONLY hit I got was your post, the one to which I'm replying.
Gerry
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http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/dado.html
G.E.R.R.Y. wrote:

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Been there, done that. Not too difficult.
Use a good quality carbide tipped cutter and make several shallow cuts. I made a frame that the router slides in and snugs up along the outside of the plank(s). When doing shelves, I like to do the two sides at the same time to ensure that the shelves are spaced dead on ____________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
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If you lived in the good old UK you would have no choice; all our saws have short arbours so that we can not use dado blades. Apparently our Health and Safety Executive believes we can't be trusted with them! Routers work great but better still with a jig; using guide bushes and different size blades you can get just about any width exactly. It still doesn't make me feel any less jealous when I see Norm Abram making a dado in abot a quarter the time it takes me! Barry Uk
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On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 17:29:44 GMT, "Barry Parsons"

Only the recent ones (mine has no trouble), and not the production-grade ones. Even Machine Mart will cheerfully sell you a dado head.

They don't like them, but that's not why we don't have short arbors. It's to do with the spin-down time regulations of PUWER 98 (Google this ng for details)
If you haven't already seen it, this is worth the read. http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/woodindx.htm
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No Guns, no knives, no pointy sticks and no dados. Something smells fishy!!
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

Depending on depth of dado, it is normal to do the cutting in multiple passes.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
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I just cut some grooves by cutting both sides with a normal saw blade and hogging out the middle with an old Stanley #70 (?) "router".
OK, I did it just for the fun of using the router plane, but it worked :-).
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That's exactly what I would've said... only I thought of a chisel to slam out the rest.
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You can make two or three cuts with a table saw at the edges of the dado and use a chisel to clean up the extra. This can be done fast, as the critical parts aren't done by hand.
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Don't forget the kerf ! Been there...
Jim Bailey

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On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 13:19:37 GMT, "Jim Bailey"

He needs a kerf-sized spacer to replace the shelf.

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Router. Check Pat Warner's site for some information on how to make a nifty jig for accuracy, IIRC there is a video but it may have been on another site.
You can nibble away with a regular blade. Instead of one pass with a dado blade, you make 8 or 10 passes with the regular blade. Not as neat though. Be sure you have stops set too.
Plane. Works for neanders
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wrote:

IMHO, nibble them on the table saw, rather than using a router. This may vary, depending on the stability and accuracy of your own kit.
You'll want a crosscut box that's nice and stable, then you just cut the two side cheeks of the dado. Remove the central waste by either nibbling at it, or with a rebate plane (a Stanley #92 is just the job) and maybe a router plane (#71) to shift the bulk. If it's not too tough a timber, then this short-grain stuff just flies out.
I wouldn't do it with a router. It's hard to get such neat straight edges, and there's a real risk of an accidental divot in at least one place. You also have to make the first cut on both sides of the bit, so one side is climb milling.
If you rout it, make a good guide jig to control the router.
Personally I'd also use a cutter about 2/3rd of the dado width, and I'd make one pass for each side. If you have the rigidity and the confidence, then do it in one pass.
A router is obviously preferable if it's a bigger piece of timber than you want to be sliding around on your saw's table.
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