Dado blade

Hey folks:
Forgive me if this post has already appeared but if so, I missed it or possibly didn't post correctly. Will watch closer this time.
My question is, what diameter dado blade should I purchase 6" or 8" and why. My saw is a Delta contractor.
All advise appreciated
Tom
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why.
A smaller blade will require less horsepower to cut with (cutting speed is slower) so it might be more appropriate for a saw with less power. I think that if you are cutting wide and deep dadoes with your saw, and your motor is 1 1/2 HP or less that you should consider the 6".
-Jack
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In rec.woodworking

While this certainly makes sense from a physics point of view, my 1.5 HP saw has no trouble spinning a 3/4" wide dado into oak with an 8" stackable on it. Granted I'm not going deep, but something tells me it could if I needed to.
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On a healthy TS the 6" dado is fine, but if you run a wimpy TS the flywheel effect of the 8" dado may be a benefit.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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flywheel
Perhaps for an inch or two and then ....
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Hi Tom. In addition to the depth and power answers, also consider rim speed. The 8" set will be travelling at about 82mph while the 6" size runs at about 62mph - at 3450rpm. That's akin to dialing down a router from 22,000rpm to 16,500rpm. Many (as in most) woods will produce a cleaner cut at the higher speed.
I bought a Freud 8" 24 tooth/4 tooth chipper set (the SuperDado, I believe it's called), years ago back when I had a Jet 1.5hp contractors style saw and never ran into any problems with it bogging down on normal depth dados in hardwoods or half-laps in 2x materials.
I don't know if the 6" would have performed just as well, but I've had no problems with the 8" set - and it's always nice to have that extra depth should the need ever arise - tho it hasn't arisen for me yet.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
Offering a shim for the Porter-Cable 557 type 2 fence design.
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wrote:

I've had exactly the same experience with my 8" super-dado set. However, I have liked the extra reach the 8" offers when I use my crosscut sled.
I'm running mine on a 1.5 hp grizzly contractors saw.
Jim
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That's an excellent point.
--
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Offering a shim for the Porter-Cable 557 type 2 fence design.
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why.
I think you could be happy with either - perhaps let cost factor into your decision. I ran a 6" in a benchtop and now run an 8" in my contractor saw. The 8" can cut deeper, but it's a capability I've not needed yet.
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You should buy the 12" then send it to me and I will send you my 6"

why.
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