Cutting Tenons

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Is your stock that you are cutting square? Try transferring a line around the stock with a good square and a utility knife. After your sure of the stock, you should be able to figure out what's happening. What makes me ask is that you stated that "sometimes" its not even. If that is the case, something is not square or something is moving. My tenons improved after I took some classes on using hand tools and was able to lay out a tenon for cutting by hand. I don't cut many tenons by hand, but I use the layout methods all the time. It's an adventure getting there (I'm not there, but I am closer). :-) Enjoy the trip. BTW, shoulder planes are used to true up tenons. A scribed line and a sharp chisel will also work.

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Thanks for all of the suggestions. I won't stop trying until I can cut them like Norm!
This question was my first post on this newsgroup and I was surprised at how quickly I got responses and the number of them.
-Thanks

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Pretty cool isn't it! I'm amazed at how much help is available here. From all different levels of experience too so you get a variety of responses.
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Larry C in Auburn, WA

"stoutman" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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How are you checking your miter gauge for 90d? It needs to be square to the miter slot. If you are squaring the miter gauge to the blade, but the blade is not parallel to the slot, your cut will not be at 90d.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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I have been cutting a few pieces of scrap wood and checking the cut with a square.
What do you recommend?

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stoutman wrote:

I'm also a bit of a newbie, and a long time lurker to this group. This is my first post, so go easy ;)
I don't really have a suggestion to help, rather a question in general.
Everybody, including Nahm, seems to use their table saw for making tenons. I haven't done a lot of mortise & tenon joints, but when I have, I have always used my table mounted router, and have had great results. One setup does it all, and the shoulders always line up perfectly. Depending on the size of the tenon, I may have to sand off some router marks, but that's all.
Am I missing some advantage of using a table saw for making tenons rather than a table mounted router?
...Mike
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No Mike the router works just fine, read the entire thread and you will understand why this current discussion was focusing on the saw

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George M. Kazaka wrote:

I have read the entire thread. I was just surprised that I didn't see anyone suggest the OP try a router if wasn't happy with the results he was getting with his table saw.
...Mike
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Mike Alexander wrote:

I don't recall him mentioning that he had a router table, but if he does you are right, it is another possibility. As it is he is using the tablesaw and should be able to make them easily but hasn't had good results at this point. Something is wrong with the setup as near as I can see. All that have replied so far have given good examples of things to look for. I think I'd suggest just backing away from it for a few days and then come back fresh, check all settings on the saw and fence and try it again. Sometimes no matter how much effort you keep trying to put into something it always backfires because you're not going at it with a fresh mind.
Scott
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See, now that's why you need to stop being a lurker and participate! It takes all kinds of opinions and maybe using a router could be a solution to his problem. Just because he was trying to use a ts with difficulty doesn't mean he HAS to use it. Perhaps his ts isn't his best tool for this job.
--
Larry C in Auburn, WA

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I use a jig that rides the rip fence designed by Frank Klausz for making slip joints described in FWW a few years ago. Haven't considered using the router table.
wrote:

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On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 11:47:38 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net"

So do I, but mine may be different.
<
http://www.bburke.com/wood/images/tenon_jig_2.jpg
Barry
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