Cutting slot using router table

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I generally agree with your statements but inthe case of the Multirouter and how it uses templates, the size accuracy of the tenon is mostly assured if you use good technique. The position and angle can be effected by the stock prep and it mightbe slightly off ceneter if stock thickness varies from the thickness used for setup, etc.
The real "consistency" issue is related making cuts off the side of an end mill type cutter. You have this long cutter cutting on edge for more than an inch. It can flex. especially if you are doing long tennons. It also can have issues at the shoulders with some chip out or minor gouging, etc.
It's a great system, it's just a little finicky to get it working well on tenons and takes some time to get used to it.
I've heard it can be finicky for wide dovetails and finger joints also but I've only toyed with them for doing M&T.

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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote

You know, I've been seeing the above online for years now, mostly from one particular detractor who's become infamous on some forums for doing so, but he admits to not ever having, or using but momentarily, a M-R.
AAMOF, I use mostly long 3/8 end mills by choice in mine, but have never had even a 1/4 end mill flex to any discernable degree when doing any task, although I admit it could do so if blunt force was used to bull through a cut ... but a router bit of that length would be far less likely to be lacking in the accuracy department, in my experience.
Basically, it's a tool that is more than accurate enough for all woodworking tasks most woodworkers will ever put it through, and as with all accurate tools, a certain degree of delicacy should be exercised in the use thereof to get the greatest benefit.
One this is for certain ... it is an absolutely invaluable "shop production" tool for a serious, professional woodworker, and it is a production chair maker's dream!
I've seen your work, I'm most impressed with the quality and your expertise, and would say that you, of all folks, deserve one yourself! :)
So, what are you waiting for?
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"Swingman" wrote

That should have been "... far more likely ..." ^
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Yep, the MR can do the job and you are exactly right, with just a little care it will always do a great job. I attributed the variance I have ssen to bit flexing and maybe I was really just seeing some small amount of variance in the whole tolerance chain. I think I do tend to bull things through with power tools. I will get a MR this year I hope. But I also hope to soon after that get a powermatic or some other single end tenoner and a Maka or Centorino swing chisel mortiser. Then I'll just push the button real hard if I am in a hurry.
Thx for the compliment.

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Got a link to this router?
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wrote in message

Oddly named, it is not a router but a terrific accessory to attach your router to.
http://www.jdstools.com/index.asp?PageAction=Custom&ID 
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Well, that explains the cost that people were talking about. I searched for M-R Router not knowing that it referred to Multi-Router and came up with several thousand Mr. Router links. I wonder how it compares with the WoodRat?
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wrote in message

I cannot say however Swingman bought one a few years ago and used it immediately to build several round backed chairs. He used a jig and the MR to cut several slots in the curved upper back and lower back sections to receive and hold the long back slats. The tool is very well made, heavy duty, and operates smoothly. I would compare it in build quality and tolerances to a quality Cabinet saw or my HD Laguna band saw. You are getting what you pay for on this tool. It will easily last a life time.
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In my opinion, the Woodrat and Leigh FMT are both fine pieces of equipment but one step down towards the home builder. The Multi-Router is more towards the commercial side. I think the biggest advantages are both the flexibility to do more types of parts and the speed at which you can run parts through the system. With the Multi-router, once you have a setup and if you use the air clamps it is pretty high production. The Leign and Woodrat are not as robust of clamping systems and take more work to get the parts clamped in position.
Of course a full production shop will have dedicated mortiser, tenoner, and dovetailers. The MR is really great for the one-off or short run custom funriture builder.
The Woodworkers supply guys have a Woodtek version of the MR called the matchmaker. Haven't heard much about it but saw it at AWFS. Looks pretrty similar. I think it uses plastic templates which might be less expensive "maybe". Took forever to find on their website. Had to find exact name elsewhere. http://woodworker.com/ search matchmaker.

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Your drawing does not "for sure" indicate whether you are using a router table and fence or a router with a fence.
I'll assume you are using a router table. I did virtually the same thing on the drill press table fence that I posted on a.b.p.w. If you pre drill a hole to begin the slot you literally have to be dead on accurate. I don't recommend doing it this way, it is an unnecessary step. Start with a shallow cut and begin the cut as close to the far left end of the cut as possible. Basically you only want to feed the stock from right to left with the stock being between you and the fence. This direction will allow the spinning router bit to keep the stock pulled up against the fence. Going in the opposite direction will cause the bit to pull the stock away from the fence.
To start the cut each time rest the tail end of the board on the table and hover the end to be cut above the bit and against the fence. With the tail end setting on the table it is easier to keep the board surface parallel to the table top. Slowly pivot the stock down on to the router bit until it rests on the table and then slowly feed the stock the required distance.
Raise the bit a bit more and repeat until the bit goes all the way through the wood.
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I just did this yesterday on some mortise holes. I used stops at each end of the fence, and lowered the board on the spinning bit, with one end of the board resting on the table. Used a feather board to hold the board against the fence.
BUT... I used some scraps first to 1st: set the exact depth of the cutter, 2nd: set the distance from the fence, and 3rd-17th! to set both stops. When all was perfect, I proceded on the actual pieces.
Oh, yes, keep yer fingers well clear of that bit!!!
Hope this helps.....
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sam wrote:

the money or the expertise to do some of the things suggested. My router is just not strong enough to cut a 5/16 inch slot in Fir, let alone cherry. I guess I'll have to come up with another way of tensioning the warp on my looms. :( but thanks to all who posted. Paul
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: sam wrote: : > I know this is going to sound stupid, but my knowledge of a router is : > mostly limited to putting a fancy edge on plaques. : > : > I want to take a 30" length of 4" wide board and put a slot all the way : > through the board about 4" long. the centerline of the slot will be 3/4 : > of and inch from the edge of the board. Where do I put the fence? Do I : > hold the board above the router and slowly lower it in position, or do I : > drill my 5/16 hole first into the board and fit the router bit into the : > hole, bringing my fence up to the board? Will I get a true straight : > clean slot this way, with no wobble? : > Thanks for any and all answers! : > Paul : Well this topic has gone far beyond answering my question. I don't have : the money or the expertise to do some of the things suggested. My router : is just not strong enough to cut a 5/16 inch slot in Fir, let alone : cherry. I guess I'll have to come up with another way of tensioning the : warp on my looms. :( but thanks to all who posted. : Paul
Why use a router table at all for this??
Attach your edge guide to the router, and set it so the edge is 3/4in from the centerline of the collet.
Clamp stop blocks to your piece at a distance equal to half the width of you're routers base from each end of the slot you want to make.
Install you're 5/16th bit, spiral flute is best for this type of work, and set it so it's just above the boards surface.
Put the router on the board, with the edge guide tight against the board, and slide it back and forth. Eyeball to verify the stop blocks are stopping the bit at the correct point. Adjust if needed.
Assuming you don't have a plunge router:
Set the bit for a 1/8in cut, bring the edge guide against the board with the bit slightly above the surface.
Turn the router on, lower the bit into the board and make your first pass.
Turn router off, adjust for a slightly deeper cut, and make a second pass.
Repeat until you have a slot.
Tedious, but not difficult. A plunge router speeds things up a bit.
Len
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sam wrote:

Sam...
With deep cuts, it's sometimes preferable to make repeated passes - with each pass removing a little more wood (perhaps 1/8"). It /can/ be done with a not-so-powerful table-mounted router, but as Puckdropper first mentioned, it's easier to exercise control with a hand-held plunge-based router with some kind of fence/guide and end stops to ensure repeatability.
Before you change/compromise your design, think about getting a little direct help from someone who already has the expertise and tools to do the job easily and who'll be willing to let you watch and learn.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Maybe for you. From personal experience, I disagree. I can make perfectly accurate, repeatable cuts on my router table. With the hand held, I suck. Hardly ever use it and will go to the table every time if I can.
I'd make the slot in multiple passes getting to about 1/2" of the end. Once through, I'd set up a mark or stop and slowly do the two ends.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

First, the key is the guide. By "guide" I don't think he's talking about one of those crappy little fence thingies that come with some routers. Make up a carrier that rides on both edges of the board or a template that clamps to the board and you should get cuts as precise at the router table.
If your router won't cut 5/16 by the way, I'd find out what was wrong with it--that's a little over 1/4 and a Bosch Colt or a Rotozip doesn't have any trouble with that. If it's a through cut though you may want to make multiple passes.
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My handheld is a DW 621. I did replace the base with one from Pat Warner and it helped. I made a cutting board and wanted a groove around it so I made a frame as a guide. Three straight out of four sides is getting better. I probably should take more time to practice.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I'm working /really/ hard to not give you what I think of as a "Robatoy response". :)
Next time you travel across Iowa on I-80, stop in at my shop for a good cup of coffee and we'll cure that problem with the hand-held router. :-D
Then we'll cut the slot on one of the CNC machines and completely spoil you for anything less than a (nearly silent) 5 hp spindle. ;-)
(O shucks - I did it anyway!)
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DeSoto Solar
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I may take you up on that. I do want to drive out that way some day.

And I bet you don't even feel bad about it :)
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wrote in message

I'll wait a bit before coming over. Though I would really like to see your setup and your solar gadgets. Is there a train somewhere near?
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Han
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