Cutting Skirting Boards

Hi Group,
I'm just about to install a floating floor in a new house. One of the problems I have is the need to leave an expansion gap between the boards and the skirts which is normally concelled by a beading strip.
The carper layer advised me that there is a tool that can cut the bottom off skirting boards allowing the floating floor to be set underneath with the expansion gap hidden.
Does anyone know what these are called, and a product/brand name?
thanks Roscoe
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Imagine it'd look a lot like a biscuit cutter.

and
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<http://www.coastaltool.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/a/crain/812_super_saw.htm?L+coastest+jrwp8341ffad5dad+1101877984
Barry
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2004 12:25:07 GMT, Ba r r y

Interesting tool... sort of a combination of a skillsaw and a router..
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wrote:

See the link I've posted in another message.
Personally, I prefer removing the trim, installing the floor with a gap, and replacing the trim. I usually undercut door jambs with a hand saw and scrap of flooring.
Modern homes have such small baseboards to start with, they don't need to get any shorter. <G> Nails can be reused if care is used pulling the baseboards. Fill the holes with an appropriately colored filler crayon.
On my personal home, I usually install new, nicer, hardwood baseboard, shoe, and cap moldings when installing a hardwood floor.
Barry
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Sounds like he is referring to a power jam saw, available at most rental shops. kind of an abortion router/saw affair. Seems like a pretty drastic measure. I guess I am missing something though. Normal practice is to remove the baseboard trim before installing the floor and then undercut the jams with a handsaw and a scrap of the flooring material for a guide as Barry suggested. I would have to think installing the flooring and trying to slide it into a recess cut into the trim would rapidly become a nightmare. Is there something preventing you from removing the baseboard?
The knotmeister
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You forgot to add the shoe molding, necessary in cases where the baseboards are only ~1/4", after installing the flooring.

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Yep,
removing the skirts and handcutting the jambs etc with a handsaw makes sense, however the whole lot is freshly painted and I'm not keen on repainting the 100m of boards/walls again (I hate painting).
Notwithstanding the skirts are fairly low, the jamb saw looks good.
Roscoe

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jamb saw

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If you do go with the jamb saw, you'll still need to clean up the corners. Also, you'd better check the floor and the base moulding for level. If you have a dip in the floor, you'll see it in the cut on the base moulding. Good luck! --dave

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Had a chat to the floor layers (installers?).
Their advise was don't do it unless you are sure the floor is dead level. I know mine isn't as I could see water puddle when it rained not long after the slab was poured. a 1-2mm gap between the skirts and floor boards can look just as bad as beading.
Maybe in the next house, which wil be 20 years out.
Roscoe

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