Cutting irregular polygons

What is the best way to cut irregular polygons? I figured I would use a template and a router but are there any online instructions that illustrate the process? Maybe a book would be better.
What I need to do is to mount the something like the following into a 1/2" or 5/8 MDF panel so that the front of the speaker is flush with the surface.
http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?&DID=7&Partnumber &9-776
r
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wrote:

I'd say the same way as regular polygons.
Are we talking about the same thing, or are you referring to compound angles in an irregular polygon? ...a much more difficult proposition.
Bill.
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What i need to do is to mount that speaker with that unuasual shape so that it is flush with the front of a panel. Not unlike doing an inlay. I am unsure how to do about it with an odd shaped piece like that.
r
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wrote:

drill or saw a round hole big enough for the back of the speaker to hang through. position the speaker in the hole and trace around the mounting flange. cut the line a bit with a sharp knife and carefully rout almost to the line with a straight bit in the router. trim to the line with a chisel.
if you have a lot of them to do make a template.
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snipped-for-privacy@igetenoughspamalreadythanks.com wrote in

I thought that is what you might say. Yes, I have several holes to cut like that. Thanks for the tips! Now I have to figure out how to make that template.
r
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wrote:

first do one in a test scrap. if you get a good fit, cut the routed part all of the way through. this may be enough right there if you will be using a top bearing bit to follow the template. if you'll be using a bushing to follow the template you'll need to enlarge the hole by the difference of radius of the bit and bushing.
be ready to make a few templates until you get one that fits well enough for your needs.
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Do you need to cut the hole first, then rabbet the outside? I used an el-cheapo B&D jigsaw on some old speaker cabinets eons ago to cut the holes for mounting the 12" speakers from my parents' old console stereo, a real hack job.
Today, I'd probably use a trim router to do the cutout (after marking the hole with the outline of the speaker) and use a router to cut the rabbet (freehand) for the inlay, then drill the mounting holes after it was seated in the new hole. Make sure to vacuum out ALL of the sawdust or it might buzz later on. DAMHIKT
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