Cutting help needed


I'm not sure what they call it but I think it might be refered to as a bayonet fitting. It's a kind of push down and twist to lock fitting. I need to know how to go about cutting that L shape in the recieving piece of wood. I will be using brass rod as the latch/sticky out bit.
Any advice please?
TR
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TR wrote: I'm not sure what they call it but I think it might be refered to as a bayonet fitting. It's a kind of push down and twist to lock fitting. I need to know how to go about cutting that L shape in the recieving piece of wood. I will be using brass rod as the latch/sticky out bit.
Any advice please?
Perhaps building/cutting the reciever in two pieces, carving out your bolt lock on one side, then some good glue? Tom
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If I am picturing this correct, you could do that with a router with guide bushing and a jig. The jig can be flat faced for the base of the jig, and use a cutter bit long enough to reach as the fitting curves away.
Might this be a quick disconnect dust collector fitting?
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You're looking for a Bayonet Neill Concelman connector, (sometimes erroneously called a British Naval Connector or Bayonet Nut Connector.
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No, he is *NOT*. "BNC" is a very specific reference for a particular type of "nominal 50-ohm impedance Co-axial cable connector" for RF use -- where the connector 'innards' are impedance-matched to that type of transmission line. The 'quick-disconnect' feature is what distinguishes it from a "TNC" ("THREADED Neill Concelman") connector. "Bayonet" connections existed _long_ before Neill and Concelman developed their _constant-impedance_ connectors.
Including, _bayonets_ -- believe it or not! -- which were affixed to the muzzle-end of rifles with that push-twist-lock mechanism. All the way back to the 1670s
Many other things use 'bayonet' fittings. e.g. automotive tail-lights, and dome lights,. bulbs for some slide/filmstrip/movie projectors, panel lights on many kinds of instrumentation , photographic flashbulbs (remember those? :) etc., etc., ad nauseum. o
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Bayonet fitting *is* the correct name.

Note: the cut-out is usually _J_ shaped. Push-turn-release, and the spring at the bottom of the hole pushes the thing up into the locked position. this way, it can't _rotate_ loose, and then come apart.

5-axis CNC milling machine? <grin>
dentists drill?
Does anybody make a right-angle attachment for a Dremel Moto-Tool (or similar)?
Seriously, probably the easiest way it to take a piece of tubing of appropriate diameter, cut the J path in that from the _outside_, and then fit that already cut tube into a cylindrical cut-out in the main wooden piece, whatever it is. You can make the bottom of the hole _just_ big enough to hold the tubing, and drill it out larger where the 'pin' will bottom out at. then fit a 'ring' around the top of the tube, to hold it tightly in place. small cut-outs in the inside of the ring, to let the pin(s) pass.
Trying to cut the slot _inside_ the hole, is *really* awkward unless you're using a _big_ diameter piece.
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Yeah, the 5-axis CNC ought to do it. I saw some really cool things done in 2" abs pipe with a CNC 4th axis ie rotation. see http://www.f1engineering.com/h_210.html
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I should really mention at this point that hole is only 1" across. So I might take woodworker88's advice. It's my little cherry dice cups/carriers with brass trim. So I might use a brass tube on the inside. Anyone know of a good adhesive for sticking metal to wood?
TR
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Epoxy, if it will be subjected to a lot of stress, or if you need to fill gaps. Cyanoacrylate ("superglue") otherwise - that's how pen turners attach the brass pen tubes to wooden blanks.
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You could use a metal (brass?) tube for the inside fitting. Make the J-shaped slots in it, and test in on the male piece.
Then glue it into the recessed hole. A chisel can cut out the wood that gets in the way.
The brass would be nearly invisible when assembled. Of course steel would be stronger.
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