cutting down / cutting up trees

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Tanus wrote:

... and easier still if you do it with a powered hydraulic splitter. :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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"Morris Dovey" wrote:

Better yet, let someone else do the job while enjoying a cold one on the beach under a cocoanut tree in someplace like the Fiji.
Lew
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Morris Dovey wrote:

And easiest yet if you have a neighbour with a splitter and way too much time on his hands. Sadly, I have neither.
Tanus
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Tanus wrote:

I'd split about 30 cords (about half elm) before I bought a splitter. If you have any quantity to split, it might be worth locating one to rent - they do save a /lot/ of work.
Heh. I had a couple of neighbors (not exactly with time on their hands, they /made/ time to come over) help me cut up about a dozen trees that'd been knocked flat in a storm. One of 'em brought a home-built frame that had a 30" circular blade (with no guard, of course) that was pulley driven from his WD45 PTO.
I think I was in my late 30's and both of these guys were in their early 70's. I'd already limbed the down trees, and one of these gents would drag a branch over to the saw, and the two of us at the saw would swing the branch into the blade - brannnnggg! I'd toss the cutoff up onto the growing pile and reach to catch the cut end of the branch coming at me to do it again. By suppertime the pile looked like a small mountain and I was sure I'd set a new record for fatigue - but the old guys were still looking pretty spry when they headed for home.
I've always thought it was a minor miracle that I still had both hands at the end of the day.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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"Morris Dovey" wrote:

<snip>
Can certainly relate.
Had an uncle in North Central Indiana who had a 1938 John Deere tractor he built a frame to hang on the front end to support a BIG saw blade that was powered by a flat belt (same as a thrasher except smaller belt).
He used it to clear brush.
Saw it mounted on the tractor and it scared the devil out of me.
Never saw it in service, just as happy I didn't.
Lew
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Reminds me of my daily count when I come out of the shop. If I can count to 21, it's been a good day. One day I counted 20. Not a good day.
Tanus
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but a) it's not eco friendly b) a splitter costs a lot more money than an axe c) I don't any exercise
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"Konstabel Els" wrote
but a) it's not eco friendly b) a splitter costs a lot more money than an axe c) I don't any exercise =================I always remember that old chestnut, "Wood warms you twice. Once when you cut it and again when you burn it."
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The axe can cost far much more than the splitter - once the doctors finish with you! Martin - I do both - but know my limitations!
Konstabel Els wrote:

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wrote:

er...you must be a tad older than myself ;-)
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Splitting rock elm at -10F - the wood heats twice that way!! But it splits cleanly and easily, compared to splitting it unfrozen.
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I'm told that alder (local hardwood in Seattle) splits best when green. I haven't tried it both ways, but local tradition on the issue is strong...
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indeed...local tradition vs logic ;-)
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We cut green and split green in Northern Ca. When you can use the hydrologic pressure of the wood itself it helps.
A lot of wood compresses and shrinks making it harder.
Martin
Luitenant Verkramp wrote:

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If the tree is cut in winter - e.g. sap down in the roots - the turn around time is much shorter. I've burnt wood the same winter - a month or less seasoning.
Martin
Konstabel Els wrote:

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Daytime.
Other than that, they say that the "sap is down" when the tree is dormant in most cases. This might mean they'd have less moisture.
Around here, they say that the white ash is one of the few trees that burns well when green.
Pick a time of year when you can work comfortably and still get the tree out of the woods. I never cut or split trees in the summer unless its an emergency. Down to about zero F is best for me. I guess that says "winter", but not January.
Pete Stanaitis -------------------
Konstabel Els wrote:

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spaco wrote:

Elm burns like the graveyard mould, Even the very flames are cold! Apple wood will scent your room, With incense-like perfume. Oak and maple, if dry and old, Keep away the winter's cold. But ash wood wet or ash wood dry, A king will warm his slippers by.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Nice verse Morris!!

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Morris Dovey wrote:

Beechwood fires are bright and clear If the logs are kept a year. Chestnuts only good, they say, If for long tis laid away.
Hard to beat olde English poetry for going right to the hea(r)t of the matter. :)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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Swingman wrote:

Yessir - and thank you for the lines I hadn't heard before!
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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