Cutting down a solid-core door

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The last time I did this I burned up my circular saw, or more specifically, the brushes. I cut four doors that day, in fairly quick succession. I'm no genius with a circular saw, but I thought I had done it right. I used a fence as a guide and set the blade to protrude maybe a half-inch below the bottom of the door. I tried not to go too fast. This was a year ago, by the way.
I've since replaced the brushes and the saw works fine. It's a pedestrian Skil model and has a fairly coarse 7-1/4" blade on it. I've also got a much older saw with a 6-1/2" 40 tooth blade. I have another brand-new HD solid-core door to cut down. It's the thinner variety that they sell, 1-1/4"?
Tips, besides having an extra set of brushes around? Something to coat the blade with to reduce friction, maybe? Cutting half the depth first? (That doesn't sound like a good idea to me, but if you're too afraid to ask, you don't learn)
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On 9/28/2011 12:14 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I'd venture the brushes failing at that time had nothing in common w/ the fact that it was the door(s) being cut; it was just there time in all likelihood.
No surprising tips other than to be sure the blade isn't _terribly_ dull and is intended for the general purpose--iow, don't use a plywood or no-set finish blade...
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On 9/28/2011 12:18 PM, dpb wrote: ...

...it was just THEIR time...
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dpb wrote:

whose time? ; )
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On 9/28/2011 1:25 PM, dpb wrote:

That makes sense, except that the saw has gotten pretty light use over the years. Maybe it was a grammar problem ... ;)
Any thoughts on which blade/saw combo would be better?
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Could be some corrosion on the commutator that took them out. The other thought is to make sure that the shoe is parallel to the blade. It may have gotten whacked somewhere along the line.

For a general purpose circular saw blade, I've liked the narrow kerf Diablo blades. That's pretty much all I used in the cordless saw. For a saw, well, Festool! (somebody had to say it ;-)
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Second that!
Try one and you'll never go back
-------------- wrote in message For a general purpose circular saw blade, I've liked the narrow kerf Diablo blades.
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Greg Guarino wrote:

The coarse one.
--

dadiOH
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On 9/28/2011 12:32 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Is this a composite solid-core (from the particle-wood tree, etc., ... :) ) or a solid-wood door?
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On 9/28/2011 2:49 PM, dpb wrote:

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On 9/28/11 2:05 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

It shouldn't matter. Even Masonite, veneered doors often have a pine frame around the perimeter. But back to my first point, it shouldn't matter. The door had nothing to do with it.
Either the saw is really underpowered for whatever reason. or your blade was really dull. Any carbide tooth blade in a decent saw would cut through a solid door with minimal effort, whether it's cutting solid wood, or termite vomit.
--

-MIKE-

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On 9/28/2011 2:26 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I wasn't asking for that reason but for consideration of finish...
A combination 24T will do reasonably well. If it is veneered you'll have better luck minimizing splinter/tearout in the surface if you score the line w/ a sharp knife first. Also, covering the cut area w/ a layer of masking or painters tape serves to help minimize that as well as provides a protection against marring a finished surface w/ the baseplate of the saw.
--
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On 9/28/2011 5:02 PM, dpb wrote:

the doors "down) the last time I did it. I plan to again.
Even though the saw had not been in any way over-used over it's lifetime, I also suspected that the brushes may have been ready to fail. But I've found that when I ask a question here, I frequently get good advice from directions that I hadn't anticipated.
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wrote:

Use a guide rail for the cut. Any wandering will be eliminated so the blade should stay at full speed all the way.
Tape, knife, guide, new blade, and an easy push on the saw should add up to giving you a quick and easy door trimming, Greg.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 9/28/2011 6:33 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Always.
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On 9/28/11 9:42 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I've but them with the little rip fence that attaches to my circ saw with perfect results.
--

-MIKE-

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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
On 9/28/2011 6:33 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Always. ------------------------------------------- Not necessary, if you have good circular saw skills.
I score both sides of the door, and stay about a 32nd back from the score mark. No problems.
-- Jim in NC
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On 9/29/2011 3:03 AM, Morgans wrote:

But seriously, I've got an aluminum guide for just that purpose which doesn't weigh any more than the straight edge a better craftsman would need to make the pencil line. Two spring clamps and voila, perfect cut.
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wrote:

I've seen doors cut freehand and know better than to ever try it (again) myself. DAMHIKT, but the others I've seen were much worse.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 9/29/11 6:27 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Lots of things aren't "necessary" but we still use them. Especially when we're talking about having one chance to make a perfect cut on an expensive door.
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-MIKE-

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