Cutting Board material

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What type of wood do people recommend I use for cutting boards. Thanks.
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On 10/25/2010 04:33 PM, trvlnmny wrote:

Non porous such as hard maple and cherry.
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On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 16:50:16 -0700, Doug Winterburn

Not oleander?
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On 10/26/2010 10:19 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Maybe for your Mother-in-Law ;-)
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trvlnmny wrote:

--------------------------- Quarter sawn timbers from the polypropylene tree.
Lew
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On 10/26/2010 12:47 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I'll stick with the real thing:
http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/docliver/Research/cuttingboard.htm
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I had a copy of that in my drawer at the shop. When they say plastic, they mean polyethylene. The only thing that is good for, is for the knives. My pre-2003 shop was surrounded by butchers who had problems with inspectors because they used poly boards. Many butchers have asked us to refinish poly boards, something I haven't been willing to do. One of my guys did do it on the side, and his belt-sander smelled like a Happy Meal from that day on.
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We were talking "porous" not "abrasive"
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End grain maple.
John
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"trvlnmny" wrote in message
What type of wood do people recommend I use for cutting boards. Thanks.
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I've use maple, cherry, walnut. They are closed grain and durable. Avoid open grained woods like oak.
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On 10/25/2010 9:52 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

It's not unheard of for cutting boards to be made of white oak, but red oak would be a definite no-no.
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Why not red oak?
What type of wood do people recommend I use for cutting boards. Thanks.
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On 10/25/10 10:29 PM, Josepi wrote:

It would corrode your knives, of course. :-p
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Monitor, keyboard, desk, etc....
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Well definitely my wood of choice for furniture (and white ash which I have mixed, previously).
Perhaps a knife block from red oak that could self sharpen your knives with it's corrosive properties, well tamed? (apologies, clare)
Reminds me, I was finally getting around to some shelves in garage (temporary workshop while finishing house) and putting a multitude of equip. cases away, yesterday. I was just about to toss an old miter saw case and I thought I would open it, just in case. There was the 80 tooth 10" blade I bought at half price from $120-130, years ago with only a few small trim jobs on it. Scanned the teeth for chips...none....what a find. Thought it was done years ago due to framing and blade change laziness. Got mostly trim to do in the house this winter, yet.
wrote: It would corrode your knives, of course. :-p
On 10/25/10 10:29 PM, Josepi wrote: Why not red oak?
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Having had my hands stained from working with white oak I'd think that the corrosion risk from tannic acid would be just as bad if not worse with white oak. The hand staining was particularly bad while making and working with white oak basket splints at Colonial Williamsburg but I've also had them stained by air dried white oak boards that had gotten wet.
John
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On 10/26/2010 5:46 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

The corrosion comment is a bit of a joke from another thread; you kinda had to be there. :-)
Yes, tannin can be a bit of a problem, but it's not exclusive to white oak. I've gotten those purple-stained hands from various other species too. And if I could only remember what those species were, I'd be more than happy to list them... but I can't. :-)
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Missed that thread....
My fingers used to be dark purple/brown to almost black from working with green white oak all day in high humidity conditions... looked terrible!
John
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White Oak has closed cells, red oak open. In wine casks and boatbuilding it makes a big difference--red oak leaks, white oak doesn't. Dunno if it makes a real difference in cutting boards or not.

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"J. Clarke" wrote in message says...

White Oak has closed cells, red oak open. In wine casks and boatbuilding it makes a big difference--red oak leaks, white oak doesn't. Dunno if it makes a real difference in cutting boards or not.
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The fact that it leaks won't make a difference in use, but it give plenty of space to absorb raw chicken juice and the like. If you take a small pice of oak you can blow through it. Lots of space for bacteria to hide.
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