Cutting beadboard

Hi. I have to cut 9 4x9 panels of beadboard to be used as wainscoating. I have a circular saw, sabre saw, sawsall, and Dremel. I'm wondering what you think would be the best combination of speed and fineness of cut. I want a clean cut but only have a ripsaw on my circular. I don't think I'll be using the sawsall for this one, either! Anyway the beadboard will be stained and glazed before cutting so I want a clean cut. How about using a formica blade on the sabre saw? I don't really want to spend $20 on a fine toothed circular saw blade but if this is the right way to do it then so be it. Any suggestions? Also, are there any tricks, like tape the cut line first, or cut face down or something?
Oh, of course I will be covering much of the cut lines with moulding, but not all of it.
Thanks, dwhite
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you don't want to spend $20 for the right tool to do the job right,you have two choices:
1. Wait until a family member dies and see if you inherit a good blade 2. Hope that for your birthday you get a gift certificate for Hacks R Us.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, OK you made your point! I just figured something like the right jigsaw blade would to the trick maybe even better than the circular blade. Like I said, if circular is the best option, then I'd do that.
thanks, (I think) :) dwhite
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you had the choice of doing a hack job with what you have now, or a first class job for another $20, which would you choose? Get a finish blade for the circular saw to do most cutting. Save the downcut jigsaw blade for cutting out for electrical devices, etc. I'm assuming you have 3/8" beadboard. If you still have problems with splintery cuts, slow the cut down. And it couldn't hurt to cut face down either. Hope this helps! --dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

want
using
line
but
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd be inclined to get something like the Freud TKR303 blade, place the good side of the sheet down, and use a straight edge clamp to guide the saw.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you don't want to spend the money on the new blade, do yourself a favor and just chuck the bead board straight into the garbage. That way you won't have to spend all that time ripping it down and patching the holes in the wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Considering the cost of the beadboard, it is just plain stupid to go cheap on the project over buying a new blade for the circular saw to get a good cut edge
Screw up a couple cuts and have to buy new panels of beadboard and you will spend close to what buying the right blade would cost in the first place
John
On Sat, 05 Feb 2005 03:57:32 GMT, "John Grossbohlin"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wainscoating.
what
want
using
so
line
but
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cut with anything you want and cover the bottom edge with base and the top with chair rail like God and Al Gore had intended.
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you are covering all the edges, the jig saw will probably be your best bet. Us a high quality, job specific blade, Bosch would be a good choice.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

want
using
line
but
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.