Cutting aluminum on bandsaw ??

I need to cut a bunch of V notches in some aluminum u channel for 90 degree bends and thought my bandsaw the best way to do this. Besides getting the appropriate blade is there anything else I should be aware of? Can the aluminum shavings cause any or many problems?
Another thought I had was to try doing it on my router table, but that seems on the dangerous side. ??
Thanks,
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You'll need to use a lower speed on the saw, if it has one. Wood cutting speed is much faster. Otherwise, thin aluminum angle can be cut with a carbide blade on the table saw.
Bowhunter
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Aluminum is easy to cut. It's softer than many hardwoods. Use a fine-tooth blade (the package will usually say it's meant for "non-ferrous metals"), and back up the workpiece with some wood scrap to get a cleaner cut.
If you're used to dumping the contents of your dust collector or shop vac into the compost heap, you probably don't want to dump the aluminum shavings in there. Other than that, I can't think of anything special.
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its easy to cut, but it will also jam up your blade real fast
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Thanks!
That's what I needed to know.
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saw in some magazine where they used blue tape to mask the area they were cutting with the band saw and it kept the edges clean.
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use a blade you don't much like. It may become dull. Than, brush the crap off your wheels/ tires before you use it on wood.
Dan V.
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If your blade gums up with alooneyum, just use some stick wax. They sell it in cardboard tubes, so it is easy to "cut" into without turning off the saw. Also, the wax can get pretty messy, so maybe you could look into an alternative product that won't be as messy.
If you don't have a high quantity to cut, you may not need the wax.
Stephen R.

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wrote:

I'd hacksaw it.
Aluminium filings in damp weather will corrode and can leave dark streaks on timber afterwards. It's easier to hand-saw than to clean the machine afterwards.
Make sure you can get the speed really slow too. -- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Use wax on the blade prior to cutting to cut down on the buildup of al on the blade.

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I'd sure use a sabre saw. And a guide if straightness were a problem. Wilson

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What you want to look for is a "Bi-Metallic" blade that is designed for cutting non-ferrous(non IRON) type metal. that means aluminum, brass, copper sheet, probably zinc sheet and so on.
Go slow and don't cut too fast so you don't heat up the blade if the stock is thick( which is to say, thicker than sheet copper, aluminum etc.). I'd wax the blade a bit too, but I also think there are spray lubricants for bandsaw blades made for this situation.
also make sure your bandsaw is tuned well. That is, make sure your cool blocks and support bearings around the blade are properly adjusted otherwise I think you may have the blade pop off.
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Regards,
JP
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Don't need the bi-metal blade at all - any wood or metal-cutting blade will work on aluminum.
The bi-metal blades have cutting teeth of high speed steel on a regular steel back. The high speed steel teeth hold up well on steel and other hard alloys, while the regular steel back is much less likely to break than a solid high speed steel blade is.
I've cut aluminum on the table saw (standard woodworking carbide or steel blades), on the band saw (woodworking speed), and with a router (carbide or steel bits). Rod, bar, sheet, plate. Will use Aluma-Tap as a lubricant when I feel like it, but not necessary. Only thing I don't like doing is cutting plate on the table saw with the rip fence or sled. Never yet had it grab or kick back, but maybe I'm lucky.
As Norm says, remember the goggles. Those chips hurt.
John Martin
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (JMartin957) wrote:

I've cut aluminum on the table saw too. It cut so smoothly, I thought I was cutting wood, until I noticed the kerfs in my miter fence :-(
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