Cutting a kerf in doweling?


Folks,
I've a need to cut kerfs in the end of doweling; the doweling is to be used to hang a couple of silk scarves (SWMBO's -- not mine!) as decoration.
The doweling will be fairly small -- probably either 1/4 or 3/8; and likely cherry or walnut. I'm not sure how wide the kerf will have to be; it won't need to be too deep into the dowel. She wants to use ribbon to hang the dowel, with the scarf draped over the dowel. (such that the kerf will capture the ribbon ...)
In perspective -- think about the notch in the end of an arrow -- something about like that.
The kerfs will have to be, of course, properly aligned.
I've thought of a couple of ways to do this:
1) construct a 'sled' to hold the doweling. I'm thinking a chunk of scrap wood, just a smidge shorter than the dowel. Route a vee groove deep enough to hold the dowel, then clamp it into place.
2) Use the bandsaw. Not sure if the kerf will be wide enough; cutting a couple of kerfs might be tricky.
or
3) -- Use a router (in a router table?), with a narrow spiral cut bit. Will this chew up the end of the dowel?
Has anyone done something like this? Is there an easier/better way to do this that I'm overlooking?
--
Regards,

JT
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It works.
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Toller wrote:

be clamped in the block, the hole and kerf should resemble the letter C in the block. Mark a line across the diameter of the hole that hits at the top and bottom of the 'C' and precut it in the block. Use a saw just wider that the ribbon or tape is thick for the kerf. When you cut the kerf put a dowel in to keep the relief kerf from closing more than it will when you cut the dowels. Cut perpendicular to the grain to help prevent splitting, unless there's a need for the kerf to run another way in the dowels. Joe
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Thanks; that seems like a better way to go!
--
Regards,

JT
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On Fri, 30 Dec 2005 18:53:31 +0000 (UTC), John Thomas

V-slot routed into a piece of 2x4 will hold the dowel steady [tape it down] while marking the ends. A thin piece of wood will rest on the 2x4 over the slot and mark along that on the dowel to have parallel slots.
Cutting: Vice and hand-saw ...be imaginitive. Widen with a small file as necessary.
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"John Thomas" wrote in message

I wouldn't even attempt this on the router table as it would take too long to jig up and be subject to splintering.
Bandsaw or table saw would be the best, with table saw being the quickest and most reproducible/precise without a jig.
On the TS you only need to drill a dowel sized hole in a piece of wood stock of sufficient thickness; adjust the blade height to the depth of the kerf; align the TS fence so the blade centers on drilled hole; push the dowel into the hole; run the shooting match over the blade (non-through cut), remove kerfed dowel, repeat any number of times.
Width of kerf can be adjusted all the obvious ways.
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I don't likely need a kerf the whole width of the dowel, but between all of the suggestions so far, I've got better ideas about how to do this.
Thanks a lot, everyone!
--
Regards,

JT
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"John Thomas" wrote in message

Drill the hole in the block at an angle.
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Fri, Dec 30, 2005, 6:53pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@intel.com (JohnThomas) hath the need: I've a need to cut kerfs in the end of doweling; <snip>
The part I like is, if you'd just gone ahead and done it, you would have been done with it hours ago. If you'd have asked your mother, she'd probably have said, "Just go ahead and do it, it isn't rocket science". LMAO
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"? - Granny Weatherwax
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Sounds like the dowels used in a bird cage for perches. Here's how I make them on my bandsaw. (it sounds more complicated than it really is)
Setup: 1. Install a stop block to set the depth of the cut. 2. Set the fence to cut approx thru the centerline of the dowel. 3. Make a single cut on one end of a dowel. 4. Swap dowel end for end. 5. Hold dowel so original cut is vertical. 6. Make a cut, rotate dowel 180 and cut again. 7. Check width of cut and adjust fence as needed. 8. Repeat 6 & 7 until cut width is correct.
Production: 1. Make a single cut on one end of a dowel. 2. Swap dowel end for end. 3. Hold dowel so original cut is vertical. 4. Make a cut, rotate dowel 180 and cut again. 5. Swap dowel end for end. 6. Hold dowel so cut on your end is vertical. 7. Make second cut on original end.
Art

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=====>Gee whiz, guys. You're really making a meal of this. Just put a small brad at the end of the dowel! Even two, if you think you'll need such. Just predrill a hole so you don't split the dowel! *G*
Leif
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Or, if just drill a hole in a tubafour that is a hair smaller than your dowels, press 'em in, run the whole mess over the table saw or other saw of your choice. Pull it out, you're done.
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