cutoffs w/ bandsaw instead of TS?

The following may be strange questions -- that is, anyone who has experience w/ a BS may know that what I need to do is obviously (1) no problem or (2) no way. While, like many here, I look for excuses to buy new toys, I really only want a new BS (now, anyway) if it will truly do what I need -- subject to operator error, as always.
I have to do loads of cutoffs of 1" lengths from 2x2 stock, and this will be an ongoing project. So many cutoffs that when I added up the loss to the kerf from the TS, I realized that I could do a lot better if I used a BS. (A lot less saw dust to cart away, too.) But, I own a POS cheapo BS which leaves too many saw marks.
Right now I am using a thin kerf Forrest WWII with a miter gauge on my Dewalt TS, so the finish and tolerance (square) are perfect. I do not need a glass finish, but I also have to have a result with no saw mark pattern and it has to be smooth enough to not need sanding, if that makes sense, and I need the finished thickness of each cutoff to be the same, front to back w/in 0.015" (at worst). Can this be done with a good BS? If so, how good a BS? Blade suggestions? Any setup tips? I would use a miter gauge on the BS, but would I do that with the fence or do a setup like on the TS w/ a block attached to the fence. (I realize that kickback is not an issue here but don't know if there are other problems with a BS if I use the fence w/ the miter gauge.)
Thanks for any help with this.
[Please reply to NG only.]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A good, properly setup bandsaw will do all that you want it to do, however ...
What is your most important issue? Seems to me that you have quality of cut, precision, waste, dust, and safety issues to consider. Might even want to throw speed of operation in there also.
Don't expect most bandsaws to give you the quality of cut, precision, or speed you are already getting on the table saw ... AAMOF, it is doubtful you will be able to improve on these particular aspects with any bandsaw.
Safety is one area that will improve with the bandsaw. Dust and waste, IME, will only be marginally better with the bandsaw.
Offhand, I'd say you need to look for another, more defendable, excuse to convince SWMBO that you need a new bandsaw. :)
Now, if it will improve your "attitude" as a gentle, caring, loving husband and/or father... that is all the excuse you need.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Something to consider when considering the waste of a 1/8" kerf vs. 1/16". The savings would be greater if your supply of wood was a continuous length. BUT, since most wood is sold in lengths ranging from 8' to 16' you are almost always going to have a waste piece left over from each board. If you have a smaller kerf, will it make that one last piece of waste long enough to use? If not, you have accomplished nothing in savings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

than my thin kerf TS blade. I thought it was closer to 1/32".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry, Probably closer to 1/32"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: Something to consider when considering the waste of a 1/8" kerf vs. 1/16". : The savings would be greater if your supply of wood was a continuous : length. BUT, since most wood is sold in lengths ranging from 8' to 16' you : are almost always going to have a waste piece left over from each board. If : you have a smaller kerf, will it make that one last piece of waste long : enough to use? If not, you have accomplished nothing in savings.
Not quite. If the difference in kerf is 1/16 inch, then every sixteen cuts will yield one more piece on the BS than the TS. In an eight foot piece of wood, cutting off 1" pieces, there would be six extra pieces if cut on the BS. Since the kerf on a BS is actually less than 1/16" (I think), then there'd be even more pieces.
Personally, given blade drift, I'd cut 'em all on the TS, unless the wood in questions is ebony or something equally precious.
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So I suppose there is no waste when planing that wood off after using the BS. Or do you leave the scrape marks ?
The kerf isn't a compelling enough reason for most comparisons. The cut depth is, and the ease of sawing (no burning the wood). Wood cut on the BS requires a more fussing with to clean it up after the cut, but the TS requires a bit more fussing to setup for a cut...
--
The software said it ran under Windows 98/NT/2000, or better.
So I installed it on Linux...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 7 Nov 2003 05:08:51 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss

Thanks to you and the others on this thread. Looks like the kerf concerns lose out. Sticking with the TS.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't mean to rain on your BS (maybe I should say BandSaw) parade...but wouldn't a good miter saw be a better choice? It would be easy to set up a stop, makes good cuts quickly, is safer than a TS, and with a vac/dust collector hooked up should make a LOT less dust... maybe I'm missing something.
I'd go with resawing to justify the bandsaw, worked for me :)
jim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.