Cut my workmate front panel in 2

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I should never use power tools when I'm tired, i know better, but ...
I have made a perfect strait cut all the way through the front panel of my workmate with my circular saw.
Any suggestion to repair or replace it?
I appreciate your inputs
Vince
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Yes. Glue in a piece of veneer the same thickness as the width of the cut. Sand it smooth. That's whast I did and it worked fine.
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Well, you don't mention the model number and they have made several versions over the years, but here is what I would do. Measure the old one, cut suitable material to match, drill where necessary and attach. No big deal.
--

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Phil
Living In The Woods Of Beautiful Bonney Lake, Washington
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Life_Is_Good_In_Austin wrote:
> I should never use power tools when I'm tired, i know better, but ... > > I have made a perfect strait cut all the way through the front panel > of my workmate with my circular saw. > > Any suggestion to repair or replace it?
Very straight forward.
Take a 1x4 piece, wrap it with clear packing tape, then C-clamp to the underside of the cut part.
Cover front and back edges with more packing tape to seal the cut edge.
Pour in epoxy, maybe 1/2 full at most, and allow to dry.
Keep an eye on the tape edges to insure epoxy doesn't drain out of cut.
Next day, fill proud with more epoxy and let set up.
Wait 48 hours, remove tape and 1/4, sand as req'd.
You are good to go.
SFWIW, been there, done that, don't need the T-Shirt.
Lew
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It's just a piece of plywood with holes. I used baltic birch to replace mine.
Not that I'd ever saw through it or anything, no I'd never do anything like that...
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf.lonestar.org
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On 16 Feb 2007 19:45:36 -0800, "Life_Is_Good_In_Austin"

My newer Workmate has a bamboo top! The older one has particle board.
An excellent and easier to find replacement would be "REAL" 3/4" cabinet grade birch or oak plywood. By real, I mean the stuff with 12 or so plies vs. 5-6. It'll stay flat, it's easy to work, and you can optionally coat it with polyurethane on both sides.
Check your local yellow pages for cabinet shops. One of them might sell (or possibly give) you a scrap large enough for the Workmate top. If you're really lucky, you might even stumble upon a scrap of walnut, mahogany, or cherry! <G>
Are any of your golf club customers contractors? They might provide a name as a favor.
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Actually, I think there have been LOTS of versions. Mine (~30 years old) is 3/4" ply, doubled at the inside (to make 1.5" thick vise jaw)
--
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On 16 Feb 2007 14:38:08 -0800, "Life_Is_Good_In_Austin"
Replace it. (replace both) Use 3/4" birch ply and you'll then have a modern Workmate that's nearly as good as the old Workmates, back when they used ply anyway, rather than MD, chipboard or bamboo.
I've just had to do this myself on Dad's Workmate (left in the rain) and a really old blue aluminium H-frame that I pulled out of a skip for my own use.
It's also worth making a set of wooden trestles with deep wooden tops and no metal fittings within a saw's depth. Now you can _deliberately_ saw though the tops with a clear conscience.For some big pieces, this is just the easiest and safest way to workYou get a few years' use out of them this way, then you just re-surface the tops and keep using them.
--
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On Sat, 17 Feb 2007 14:03:39 +0000, Andy Dingley

Is there no institutional memory on this NG.
Can you really forget Paddy sawing through the workmutt?
Look at Deja (sorry - gurggle)
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wrote:

... snip

That, or he can just wait until he saws through the other side before replacing it.
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Very nice.
Found a good piece of wood for 51 cents at HD. I will give it a try as my implementation of the glue solution does not look very sturdy.
Vince
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Life_Is_Good_In_Austin wrote:
> > Found a good piece of wood for 51 cents at HD. I will give it a try as > my implementation of the glue solution does not look very sturdy.
Which is why I suggested thickened epoxy.
It definitely WILL do the job.
Lew
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I will give it a try tonight.
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I will give it a try tonight.
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Life_Is_Good_In_Austin wrote:
> I will give it a try tonight.
Don't try to do the whole job in one shot.
Thicken the epoxy to the consistency of mayo so that it will NOT pour, but rather needs to be pushed into the groove with a stick.
Fill the top half of the cut a little proud, then wait at least 72 hours.
Switch the 1x4 from top to bottom and re-clamp, then finish filling a little proud.
Wait 72 hours, sand both sides flush and enjoy.
Lew
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I don't want to question your method, Lew, but as I read the OP's original post, he cut right through the panel, not just cutting a groove in it but making it into two separate pieces. I fully believe that your method would work well for repairing a kerf sized groove but I am not so sure that it would work for joining the two pieces back together.

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Doug Brown wrote: > I don't want to question your method, Lew, but as I read the OP's original > post, he cut right through the panel, not just cutting a groove in it but > making it into two separate pieces. I fully believe that your method would > work well for repairing a kerf sized groove but I am not so sure that it > would work for joining the two pieces back together.
If the repair is made correctly, don't bet the farm. The repair is far stronger that the basic wood.
If you truly want strength, lay a piece of 6-10 glass on each side.
Lew
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I have no doubt that the epoxy will be hard enough, but I am concerned about the bonding within the bamboo fibers. This is where my experimentation with the glue failed I believe. It did not get in as it does with pine wood.
How would you recommend to prepare the board 2 pieces to ensure that the epoxy will penetrate and "grip" on/in the wood?
Instead of the glass, I plan to glue some thin hard wood under the board to re-enforce it after the epoxy cured completely. That should add some support.
Vincent
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I have no doubt that the epoxy will be hard enough, but I am concerned about the bonding within the bamboo fibers. This is where my experimentation with the glue failed I believe. It did not get in as it does with pine wood.
How would you recommend to prepare the board 2 pieces to ensure that the epoxy will penetrate and "grip" on/in the wood?
Instead of the glass, I plan to glue some thin hard wood under the board to re-enforce it after the epoxy cured completely. That should add some support.
Vincent
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I have no doubt that the epoxy will be hard enough, but I am concerned about the bonding within the bamboo fibers. This is where my experimentation with the glue failed I believe. It did not get in as it does with pine wood.
How would you recommend to prepare the board 2 pieces to ensure that the epoxy will penetrate and "grip" on/in the wood?
Instead of the glass, I plan to glue some thin hard wood under the board to re-enforce it after the epoxy cured completely. That should add some support.
Vincent
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