Cut List software?

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codepath wrote:

Yuppers. Part of the problem /is/ code bloat. In six years I managed to find exactly one bug (I *discovered* it back in Red Hat Linux 4.2) and reported it /to the author/, who produced a corrected version of the module and made it available to the world in less than twenty minutes.
I'm still waiting for Microsoft's promised RTC fix for COBOL-80. Actually, I'm not really still waiting - I've decided that the guy who made the promise had a chronic integrity impairment. Care to guess who it was? [Hint: I already know that everyone reading this newsgroup knows his name.]

Microsoft has a well-earned reputation for letting their customers find the bugs for them. By the time MS-DOS 3.2 came out, I was already bored to tears with the lame excuses. You must not have been around for Windows 3.x, which would not and could not have been released by any software firm making even a pretext of caring about quality. If you're able to stir up a little pro-activity on my still extant COBOL-80 compiler problem, it'd be appreciated.

A comforting mantra, no doubt, to producers of buggy software. To at least some others (like myself) it's a lame excuse for doing a sloppy job. Every bug represents a real world failure to produce a full-quality product. We all fail sometimes. Microsoft would seem to Excel at it.

Issues? I call 'em "bugs". Lame? Interesting choice of words - not one of the ones I'd have chosen to describe their business practices.

I can appreciate that MS developers down there in the trenches really do try to create the best software they can; and that they would never knowingly release defective code. I just wish they were more capable, more knowledgeable, did more complete pre-release testing, and devoted more effort to functionally critical areas and less to screwing around with "easter eggs" and dancing paper clips.

I'm not a true "Microsoft hater" yet - I seem to have gotten stuck in the "disgusted" stage. If it offends you that my Linux box lives in my shop (where I really need the reliability) and that I post from SWMBO's windows box at home - well, I have to admit that it offends me too. (-:
I'm not a Microsoft hater - I'm a /bug/ hater; and I tend to have a low regard for companies who sell defective products and/or don't make good on their committments. YMMV.

Not worthy of an answer.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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I don't know about jpeg, but there was a bmp buffer exploit some time ago that could be used to infect Microsoft systems.
says...

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Man, you really opened yourself up for flames here. You're not going to win any arguments, so you should just stop posting in this thread.
Micro$oft programmers' opinions of themselves is a huge part of the problem. You think you're badass, and stuff starts slipping through the cracks.
I'm a game programmer and we were forced to "upgrade" to .NET for XBox development. What a heap of crap it is. There are so many problems that I can't believe it got out the door. Even more stunning is the fact that there are no service packs for these problems.
Micro$oft ruined SourceSafe when they bought the product, renamed it "Visual SourceSafe," and destabilized it. Now everyone is running to Perforce because some "not too shabby" programmers there decided to innovate.
Micro$oft is the Wal-Mart of software. Nobody likes them. They're both the biggest, they both sell crap, and everyone buys it.
At least I don't use Windoze much at home. I don't use a computer much at home. I head out to the wooodshop :)
You can think you're as badass as you want. You may even be badass, but you're not smart for putting your efforts into a company that takes no pride in it's products. Through poor quality, Micro$oft tarnishes the "Made in USA" label just as badly as the American automakers. At least there are better, more popular choices for cars.
-Mike
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Mike Reed wrote:

;-) I've been writing code since the 1970's and I'm quite (favorably) impressed with .NET. Of course it's not perfect but a lot of it is pretty darn close. ASP.NET is better for web apps than anything else I know about.
I'm still pining for VB6-style MDE development windows because they make much better use of screen space on multiple monitor computers. But other than that everything I use has been improved under .NET.
YMMV... <g>
-- Mark
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I think the .NET feature set is incredible, it's just the bugs that ruin it. We use it for C++.
Two major examples:
When I pull code, and a project file changes, I only get prompted the /first/ time -- if I pull later, I get no prompt and the project file doesn't reload. We've had to resort to closing .NET completely, pulling code, then restarting and reloading the solution.
RetardiSense(tm) only works about 10% of the time, and I can see no pattern of when it works. Most of the time, I get the wonderful "IntelliSense: 'No additional information available'" Ugh. Makes me feel like I'm editing with Notepad.
The developers that released this piece of wonderment are "not too shabby," huh? Dumbasses.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Part of it is the culture. You don't get hired unless you show that you can solve some of those irritating mental puzzles (you know the ones like 5 missionaries and 5 cannibals have to get across a rope bridge ...). Some people do well at it, some don't, but IMHO, that doesn't provide a very good indication of how innovative or how "out of the box" you are going to be in a real environment. What it does do is guarantee hiring a certain type of person. The kind of person who, for example, might take great delight in writing clever little easter eggs into flagship software products. In Msoft's opinion (or at least it used to be several years ago) that was a prime qualifier to get hired.

Ah yes, the infamous, "Microsoft freedom to innovate" which typically means "freedom to deviate from the standard into our own proprietary format". Which translates into software and data that is only readable using a Microsoft product, and, since Msoft has such a share of the market to force the adoption of the Msoft product by just about everybody in order to be able to access the data they need.
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Yeah, that's for sure. When I was about to graduate with my CS degree, I interviewed with Micro$oft just for practice. I knew they had a challenging interview process, and I had zero interest in actually working for them. I did well with the technical and puzzler questions (I really like those kinds of problems).
I declined a second interview.
Boy, the job market sure was different back then :)
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I don't think too many woodworkers could spend $400 on this type program.
Neal
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I have started using CutList last year and it makes a world of difference in my wood buying trips and figuring out panel cutting from plywood. Its made more difference than I expected.

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I'm looking at the CutList "compare features" page right now. Can anyone explain what "copies allowed per part" means? I'm not really likely to make 1000 copies (or 5000 for the gold version) of anything, but...
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"Ed Clarke" wrote in message

It's not anything to concern you unless you are running a production shop and making hundreds of a particular item, say like a Mission hall bench.
Let's say the bench requires 25 slats of the exact same dimension. Your enter the slat (part) once in CutList program and the number of "copies" that you would make for each bench would be 25.
You can see that if you were going to use the program to figure the cost, cutlist, layouts, and raw materials list for a 100 of these benches, you would need the Gold version.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 3/27/04
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Ah! Now I understand - it's nothing to concern me as a hobbiest.
Now, I'm looking at the samples on the register page:
    http://cutlistplus.com/register.aspx
There's no way you're going to cut sample #1 or #2 with a table saw. Do these cutlist programs presume that you're going to use a saber saw to cut out the pieces? Even sample #3 looks a little "iffy"...
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I think you could do both #1 and #2 with a table saw. You would have to flip it 90 degrees a number of times, but you could do it.
Joe
Swingman wrote:

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"Joe Tylicki" wrote in message

With Cutlist Plus you can change the optimization, and thus the cut layouts, between maximum utilization of material with minimum waste or vice versa. You can also change the grain direction of the cuts as well as specify the amount(%) of waste you can live with .
In short, there are a number of ways to do cut layouts depending upon these parameters, as well as optimization for yield when dealing with rough lumber.
I don't work for the company and there might be software out there just as good, this is solely my experience with that particular program.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/02/04
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snipped-for-privacy@cilia.org says...

With CutList you can specify whether you prefer rip or cross cuts, which will result in radically different layouts for some projects.
--
Charles Jones -- Loveland, Colorado
ICQ: 29610755
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It only took me about 5 minutes to find the registration code on the internet.............
Charles Jones wrote:

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You probably will not object then when someone comes and STEALS your property.

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Insurance will cover the loss.
Sprog wrote:

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But not your honor or integrity.
--


>Insurance will cover the loss.
>
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In rec.woodworking

You're a slimy dirtbag mapscum. There is no insurance to cover what you're stealing from a guy that devoted countless hours to writing an excellent program. I hope you choke on the $30.00 you saved cheapskate.
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