Customer service


Good customer service is so rare these days that I'm motivated to comment when it happens. I purchased a Fuji Q4 HVLP unit recently after some research and several e-mail exchanges with Paul Smith of the Fuji firm. My shipment arrived in good condition but a packet containing the manual and a few small parts was missing. An e-mail to Paul resulted in a next day arrival of the missing packet. I think that's about as good as it gets.
Max
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I hate to take the wind out of your sales but you have apparently been dealing with poor service for so long that you have learned to accept the quick replacement of missing parts as good service. As I have mentioned before, that is simply the right thing for a vendor to do. You should expect NOTHING less. You had to wait until the next day to use something you have already received. Good service begins with the manufacturer and evolves through the delivery of the merchandise. If there are no problems or missing parts you have received good service. Good service prevents problems before the customer sees them. There are many vendors that actually open packaging to insure that every thing is there before shipping to their customers.
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The package appeared to me to have been opened by the seller (Amazon) (no shipping charge, I get points for charging on my Amazon Visa.). And the factory box had been inserted into the sellers box (double boxed). It's certainly possible that the mishap occurred at the factory but the evidence suggests otherwise. I'm acutely aware of customer service; my wife managed a department store that was well known for their service and she is a Hawk about it. The CEO of Fuji spent enough time communicating with me about the product that I'm satisfied that he is serious about good customer service. I think good service has become a relative term for a number of reasons. The labor market is probably the most obvious. Quality control costs and it takes much more training and motivation of workers than it used to. Not that it can't be done but it certainly affects the bottom line. And, in the end, the price of a product. I don't always buy the top of the line when I make a purchase and I recognize that certain compromises in the engineering, manufacture and marketing of a product will be made. I seek value. If I felt the need to complain about the missing parts, my complaint would be directed at Amazon.
Max
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