Custom scotia: router or tablesaw?


I need to make a piece of custom scotia molding for under the treads of our staircase.
I need to match existing trim that is 100+ years old and I have not been able to find the size in the store.
The dimensions are: 3/4 x 1/2" The lip dimensions are 1/3" on the 1/2" side and 1/8" on the 3/4" side (these dimensions are different from what I have seen on modern Scotias)
- What is the best way to fabricate and replicate the molding myself?
- If I use a router, what type of bit should I use? cove?? If so, what size.
- Other people have suggested using a tablesaw with the wood at angle to the blade. If so, how do you decide what angle to use?
Finally what are the advantages and disadvantages of each approach?
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Forget the tablesaw. That can be used for certain cove moldings, but you have limited radius to work with.
Router in a table or a shaper is the way to go. I would not try a hand held for a molding I don't know exactly what your piece looks like so I can only suggest looking at different profiles, maybe even using two if it is not a constant radius. Go to http://www.infinitytools.com/products.asp?dept 14 for starters. or here http://www.ridgecarbidetool.com/html/double_fillet_cove.htm
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This is not the answer but you may find it of some value.
http://www.traditional-building.com/article/moldings.htm
Lee Valley has a nice selection of core box bits:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p0169&cat=1,46168,46176&ap=1
Bob S.
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