Custom router plate to accept bushing guides

I have a Skil 1825 plunge router. I bought a template guide set (http://tinyurl.com/33draq ), but unfortunately the adapter doesn't fit. (Murphy's law - if it fits "most" routers, yours isn't one of them...) I figured the easiest solution would be to make a custom base plate out of some 1/4" MDF. Very rigid and easy to work with.
My problem is that I have no clue how to mount the adapter, or how large the hole should be for the bushings. This is probably something obvious, but I'm stumped.
The adapter ring has a "flat side" and a "beveled" side, and four holes to mount it to the plate. Which side goes against the plate? I assume it's the flat side.
The bushing guide consists of the threads, a ring, and finally the actual guiding cylinder (http://tinyurl.com/3bmzyr ). The ring is 1 3/8" in diameter, the threads are 1 1/8". From what I can glance from the various image on the Net (e.g. http://tinyurl.com/2neqtk ), the hole should be 1 1/8" in diameter, large enough for the threads to go through, but small enough for the ring to hold the guide to the plate (i.e. stand proud). Correct? Or should the ring be flush with the router plate?
Any advice appreciated!
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In order for guide bushings to work properly, they have to be centered around the bit. I think it would be very difficult to make a base plate that would allow you to keep the guide busing centered. My porter cable (PC) plunge router base plate allows me to center the guide bushings by using a centering bit that came with my guide bushing set. This might be difficult for you to accomplish with a home-made base plate. I think I might be time to upgrade to a new plunge router (i.e. PC or one that accepts PC-like guide bushings).
Good luck.
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Bas wrote:

I want a set of guide bushings myself, but have been unable to find any that flat out say they will fit my router. I been thinking about making a baseplate to accept the templates. One style of template wants a 1 3/16's inch thru hole, and a 1 3/8" counterbore to sink the face of the template guide flush with the surface of the router baseplate. These templates come with (or you order separately) a threaded retainer ring to engage the threads in the template guide. Was I to make such a router base (I haven't done this yet, but I'm thinking about it) I would use acrylic plastic so I could see what I was doing better. Then I would mount the blank plastic to the router, and use a small router bit to bore the center hole. That gets the center hole ring lined right up with the router chuck. Then I would use a hole saw in the drill press, at lowest possible speed, to first do the counter bore, and then finally cut the thru hole. Or, I might wager $18.50 with Lee Valley and order item 46J91.05, adapter base plate in acrylic which is advertized to fit "most" routers. Again, I haven't actually done any of this, so no guarantees.
David Starr
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David Starr wrote:

Thanks David, that helps a lot visualizing what the result needs to be.

Acrylic/ lexan would definitely be better than MDF. If I can make a good template out of MDF, I'll upgrade.
Then I would mount the blank plastic to the router, and

Making the center hole should be pretty easy, just plunge down a small router bit. But, making 1 3/8" and 1 1 3/16" holes isn't quite as simple...my hole saws come in 1", 1 1/4", 1 1/2", ...

Quite a few people have made the suggestion to buy instead of build. How come everyone is wrong and I'm the only one right? :-) That adapter plate looks real promising.
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Bas wrote:

Gloat. :-) I have a hole saw marked "Dial Saw", continuously adjustable. "Cuts holes from 1 1/8" to 2 1/2" it says on the top. No model number, no maker's address. Dunno who made it, I inherited it from my father. Since he is now deceased, I haven't bothered to ask him where he got it. Probably Radio Shack or Spags, or some such quality retailer.

I tend to like stuff I made myself too. I had to pull down the Lee Valley catalog to check the guide bushing diameters, and my eye fell on the beautifully made, beautifully photographed picture of a crystal clear transparent router base plate on the same page as the gorgeous, gleaming, brass, router guide bushings. All the stuff in that catalog looks like jewelry, and I'd love to own it all, except I don't have that much room in the shop. Or money in the checking account...
David Starr
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Take a look at the Leigh Jigs web site.
They offer several adaptors to enable you to use most any router with the PC style guide bushings. Leigh uses their own unique guide bushings for some jigs however their bushings mount just like the PC bushings do.
http://www.leighjigs.com/ugs.php
Five them a call, I bet they will have an answer for you.

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Going a bit farther for you,
http://www.leighjigs.com/download/Guidebush%201.PDF
According to this chart you need to get the adapter from Skil. Skil part # 91803.
You can get it here.. $7.38 + s&h
http://www.toolsforless.com/product/5235.html
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Leon - thanks for looking all this up!
The chart lists RAS140 for the Skil 1825, and 91803 for the other models. Interesting, since RAS140 appears to be a Bosch plate...
I think I'll get both. Hard to go wrong for that kind of money.
Leon wrote:

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Your are welcome. Sorry for looking up the wrong model but you apparently and correctly double checked my findings. Good luck.
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If making your own doesn't work out . . .
I was in a similar situation with a Ryobi RE180PL plunge router. I found though that the Milescraft TurnLock Base Plate[1] and TurnLock Bushing Set[2] could be made to work. It's all plastic and not as nice as having brass bushings--but it works well enough for me.
From looking at what routers are directly mentioned[3] I see a Skil 1823. I don't know how close or different that might be to your model. If you have a Lowes nearby, they should have the Milescraft stuff in stock to look over.
[1]: http://milescraft.com/router/1200.html [2]: http://milescraft.com/router/1202.html [3]: http://milescraft.com/instruction/baseplatefit.pdf
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Michael Faurot wrote:

I saw the set at Lowe's, but it looked real flimsy to me. It also looked pretty expensive for what you're getting.
Then again, you have something that works, and I don't.
Thanks for the suggestion.
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)81268169&sr=1-2
Will the above possibly work?
Allen

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Making your own base isn't hard. Phenolic (paper or linen reinforced) or polycarbonate (a.k.a. Lexan, Tuffak) are both durable enough and better than MDF. You don't want it too thick, or bit reach gets compromised - quarter inch is about right. Look for a plastic supplier in your area. Or, ask a sign shop about scraps.
First, get the attachment points scribed accurately on the blank. Remove the original base, center it on your rough-cut blank, and mark holes. Drill and countersink them (I like to use Allen screws to hold the base plate on), then attach the new base, put a bit in the router and use it to plunge the center hole. If you use flathead screws, the taper/countersink does centering pretty repeatably.
Then put a dowel (1/4" steel dowel) in place of the bit and using another router and 1/4" bit, trim the outer edge of the plastic. Iit will be a match for the second router in diameter, this way, and well centered on the spindle. Is that clear? You guide the outside circular cut by the second-router base against the dowel...
Finally, remove the new base and center it on a drill press -using a 1/4" dowel in the drill press to center. With a hole-cutting jig, or even a simple hole saw if the size is right, cut the central hole to size. I think some jigs work best with a recess for the ring as well as a hole for the threaded barrel. You want the ring around the guide to provide the centering, NOT the threads, which work best with some clearance.
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