Curious about ebay

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Answers for that depend on the platform. And whether you have control of the mailserver, or can only do 'filtering' when you read your inbox.
Good freeware tools include "MIMEdefang", and Spamassassin". You may hae to rummage for a while to find an implementation varient that fits your platform and method of use.
Google is your friend.
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<<Actually, many of the grammar/spelling errors are _deliberate_. So that the 'erroneous' construct will not match the patterns used by tools that block traffic based on the 'correct' words/phrases.>>
I seem to get dozens of emails every week informing me that the mortgage application they imply I have filed with them has now been approved and asking me what I'm waiting for. I am so sorely tempted to reply to them (but of course I'm not going to) that because their email to me is so sloppy -- littered with spelling and typographical errors -- I feel I can't trust them to properly attend to the details of my finances so I will be taking my business elsewhere <g>
Lee.
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"





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Phishing is what it is called.
Not just those two, but Citi Bank, People's Bank, and a few others. Most are caught in the SBC/Yahoo filters, but some get through. They do look legitimate
I like the line "do not try to access your account for 48 hours until our update is complete"
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I can't conceive to whom in the world they could possibly "look legitimate".
I am absolutely amazed that <anyone>, <anywhere>, <ever> responded to any of this... :(
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On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 13:18:21 -0500, Duane Bozarth

I know a woman, a loan officer at a mortgage company, no less, who did just that. blew me away.
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Millions of unsuspecting people out there. If you go to the web page they link you to, the logos and text are generally stolen from the real web page.
Just because people own a computer it does not make them smarter than the ones that fall for the mail scams in official looking envelopes.
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<<I can't conceive to whom in the world they could possibly "look legitimate".>>
Some of them look amazingly convincing -- right down to the part where they include the actual links to fraud reporting departments of the entities they are spoofing.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"






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Lee Gordon wrote:

Whatever...
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wrote in message

to a legitimate log in screen. Always, close the email and log in on the secure webpage as you normally do. I've had legitimate brokers and banks actually try to get me to do this and I give their security department a stern lecture each time. OBTW, NEVER click on a link to a login screen within an email.
Gary
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Gary wrote: >

I just wanted to reinforce what Gary wrote. I'm a computer programmer in my day job. The emails these "phishers" send out often encourage you to click a link to log in to ebay or PayPal or whatever, and the link actually says "http://www.ebay.com/login " or something like that. In HTML, you can have the text of a link say anything you want, but the actual target of that link is something entirely different. So while the link says http://www.ebay.com/login , the actual target is http://user32.hypernet.ru/boris119/ebayscam/ or something.
Worse yet, there was a bug in Internet Explorer last year that let a knowledgeable hacker exploit the browser so that the address bar at the top of the page would actually say whatever they wanted, even though the page was actually being displayed from a completely different location! So if you clicked on a link in these phishers' emails, your browser would go to a page that looked just like eBay's login page, and the location bar of your browser would actually say "www.ebay.com/login", but the page is actually coming from a completely different location.
Be careful out there. Trust no one when it comes to your money. Type in the address yourself, or use your bookmarks. Never trust links in emails, even if they appear to be from trustworthy sources.
Kevin.
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The version of Firefox running on my machine warns me when the target url: differs from what the html says. Or at least I think it does. I get a pop-up box...
Patriarch
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Charlie Self wrote:

Look for the "Busted up Cowgirl" Link a little way down the page.
http://pmccl.com/security/security.html
The world's funniest description of e-Bay scammers and the 419 scam...
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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