Cupped Glue-up...need advice

So, my first major glue up didn't go exactly how it should have. I glued 7 boards of cherry together to make a 40" x 68" (x 3/4" actual) table top. But half way through the glue up I realized I should have used a slow acting glue. In my rush I must have tightened up the clamps too tight (or made some mistakes with the jointer). Anyway, now I have a slightly cupped table top. Any suggestions for flattening out the table top? Thanks!
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apt snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Don't be afraid of actually ripping the top apart on the table saw along the joint lines and doing it over. As long as you can spare the loss of a little width, you'll be much happier.
Kim
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There ia simple solution, put in he back of your pickup /suv/truck/station wagon ,take it down to your local mill shop, one of those that has been there forever and does whole house jobs .see the shop forman and ask him to run it through a 48" timesaver [belt sander] . They know you are a woodworker and no threat to them and most formen work with wood because they like it . Might cost a sixpack or perhaps a few bucks and chalk it up to experience.
Next time just do a couple of boards at a time and let them dry of edge ,ie both side exposed to the same conditions . After gluing let it alone for a couple of days ,then do a couple more using the same procedure .Doing it this way correcting a couple of boards is doable . Then start gluing up the pairs of preglued boards ,again making sure you have air to both sides .You still might run into some problems, but probably nohing you cannot handle .
keep the top until you are ready to install with air to both sides and when you finish it do the same to both sides, ie same finish and same number of coats ....mjh
-- mike hide http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2

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Jeb: A number of good suggestions so far--here's one that's a bit tougher. If the cup is small, say 1/8" or less, and you don't mind a little effort, and the top can stand to be a bit thinner, you might hand plane it. Start with a number 5 and move to a number 7 to smooth. Plane the center of the convex side first, then the edges of the concave side. Plane across the grain first, then along the grain to smooth. Scrape or sand as needed. Yeah, it's work, but if a beginner like me can do it, so can you. I flattened a pine table top nearly as large as yours to within a few thousands using this method.
Bob Schmall

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Can you elaborate on the elongated slotted holes? The table will have a 4" apron with hepplewhite legs.
Oh, all the things you learn after you've spent all the money, and energy. What fun being a new woodworker!
Thanks! jeb
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apt snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Jeb Sawyer) wrote in message

I looked at the glue up again and there may be more cup than I previously thought. I'm reluctant to cut it apart because of some significant snipe problem with my jointer. I'm wondering If I sandwich the tabletop between 2 4x8 panels of 3/4" MDF (with the arc up) and rested my Ford Ranger on top of it for a couple of days, if that would flatten it enough that i can use the elongated screws.
Anyone have any experience with vehicles for weight? Is this just ridiculous? I thought of using cinderblocks, but don't think there would be enough weight. Is there a chance of the glue-up breaking (I did use biscuits).
Maybe my Corolla would be a better choice.
Good lord, why didn't somebody tell me _THIS_ about woodworking.
Thanks, Jeb
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So why did you ask for suggestions ???
-- mike hide http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2

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I asked for suggestions because I'm still trying to find a feasible method of fixing the cupped table and I had previously underestimated how large the cup is. So, I must first figure out how to get the cup down to something feasible to use the suggestions for. I have really appreciated all of the suggestions, but from my estimation they won't work in the first phase because:
1) Ripping along the joints - would love to use this method but my jointer has serious snipe problems which would decrease the overall width of the table by about 5". Unfortunately, the place my wife is planning on putting the desk needs to be at least 68".
2) Time Saver - Glue up is _too_ cupped to be effective
3) Planing - Once again, too cupped.
The elongated screw holes will probably used in the second phase of fixing this disaster.
-jeb
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