cu ft in a gas cylinder

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George E. Cawthon wrote:

You can if the cubic feet are _standard cubic feet_ because a standard cubic foot of gas is independent of the actual volume of the gas.
...

'tis reasonble assumption, given the question.
--

FF


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George E. Cawthon wrote:

By hooking it up to a compressor. That is the usual way. You pump that .5cf cylinder up to 3000 psi and later when you open the valve, you'll get 80 cf out of it. Amazing.

I know it's not solid. I also know it's not supposed to hold a liquid, as the OP already alluded to it holding 80 cf. You can compress the hell out of a liquid but you won't appreciably decrease its volume so that the cylinder could hold more. So we're talking about a gas. How am I wrong?
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE
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I posted a link to the phase diagram a day or two ago. See http://www.science.uwaterloo.ca/~cchieh/cact/c123/phasesdgm.html . At about -80 C, solid CO2 is in equilibrium with the gas. You need a temperature of -31 C to get a liquid, but then the equilibrium pressure is 5.1 atm. Above that temperature, liquid CO2 can exist at high pressure, until conditions reach the critical point at 31.1 C and 78 atm. For higher T, no surface will form regardless of the density; it is called a superfluid state. Class over.
Steve

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The volume of the cylinder is piR^2H, so (roughly) 3.14X3X3X324 cu inches. Divide by 12X12X1228 to convert cu in to cu feet=.523, lets say 1/2 a cubic foot for convenience and to allow for cyl wall thickness, etc. If it's a common gas cylinder it will usually be compresssed to about 2500psi, so if we let that 1/2 CF expand by releasing it tio atmospheric pressure of roughly 15psi, it would take up .5X2500/15 cu ft, which is about right.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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The gas compresses and will until it turns to a liquid.
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measuered as 80 cu ft, at _one_atmosphere_. Compressed to *much* higher levels, to fit in the limited space. :)
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Check this program out . . . . it is the finest conversion & problem solving program ever . . . .
PROKON
http://members.sockets.net/~schwartz /
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Not quite as sophisticated, but free, is Convert
http://www.joshmadison.com/software/
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