Crown moulding -- which way is up?


I'm going to put crown moulding in the bathroom I'm remodeling. While I was sanding the moulding I realized I didn't know which way was up. I've been told that for years but never believed it.
With some styles such as dental moulding it is somewhat clear which way it should be oriented but with other styles I haven't got a clue. Is there a rule of thumb to tell which side should be up or is it primarily what the individual prefers?
Thanks, R.C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 15:56:47 -0500, Richard Cranium

Most crown molding is composed of a small cove (scotia) on the bottom and a larger cyma, or ogee (shallow S curve) curve at the top.
http://www.altereagle.com/How_to_install.html
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard Cranium wrote:

The traditional way (dare I say "correct"?) is for the large cove to be down...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard Cranium wrote:

if you look at the angles on the back side, you'll see that one way will place the molding more on the wall than the other way. The orientation that places the molding lower on the wall is the correct way.
"Finish Carpentry: The Best of Fine Homebuilding" is just one of many books that will help get you up to speed on crown installation.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 15:56:47 -0500, Richard Cranium

If the crown has a cove detail it normally goes down. It's always been my belief that crown was originally designed this way so that if you needed to mold down the side of a cabinet you could just cope a piece of cove mold into the cove detail on the crown.
Mike O.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I thank all of you for your replies.
Based on the answers from this small population it appears that the following methods are used:
1. The small cove is suppose to be near the bottom.
2. The large cove is suppose to be near the bottom.
3. If there is any cove it should be near the bottom.
4. The side with the greater length should be on the wall.
Therefore, it would seem that whatever orientation the individual prefers would not cause the end of the woodworking world as we know it. It will have to agree with at least one of the above answers.
R.C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard Cranium wrote:

:) True, you'll find it in both orientations...but, the following url has some nice pictures of typical profiles for your consideration...
http://www.crown-molding.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Jul 2005 08:37:41 -0500, Richard Cranium

As someone's tagline reads: "go not to usenet for the answer, for they will say both yes and no."
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LRod wrote:

Hmmmm, I don't know, but I'm not sure!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LRod wrote:

When have you seen a properly installed crown moulding installed with the long side on the ceiling instead of the wall?
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"That's the nice thing about standards -- there are so many to choose from." -- source unknown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.