Crown molding installation question

Page 2 of 2  

Is caulking the corners better than spackling? I assumed spackling is better since you can sand it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think elastomeric caulk would be much less prone to cracking than spackling.
This is what I use:
http://www.dap.com/product_details.aspx?product_id=4
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You really don't want to spackle the crown molding, especially in the joints. They WILL crack. Use a good caulk and you can shape it as you apply it. If done correctly, you should need very little and running your finger along the joint will set it perfectly.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving


"Silk" < snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Take some time and a few lengths of scrap, and learn to cope the molding joints. It's frustrating practice at first (you'll probably ruin several feet), but the final product is well worth the effort.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bear in mind that a "regular miter cut" for crown molding is not what you may think it is if you've never done it before- you can't just lay it flat and cut a 45" angle. You need a compund miter saw, and it won't be as good as coping in any case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 Jun 2005 03:20:26 -0500, Prometheus

Actually you don't need a compound saw. As long as your crown is not too big for your mitre saw you can cut it with the blade straight up and down. You can even cut it with a hand mitre box if you have the time. IMHO the easiest way to cut crown (inside corners or outside) is to place it upside down on your miter saw with the crown laying at the same angle as it will lay on the wall (except upside down), turn your saw to a 45 and cut. A left or right outside cut will do the outside corners and a left or right inside cut for your copes depending on which direction you are running. Once you get used to cutting crown this way, you won't need to lean that saw over very often. Now if the crown is too large for the mitre saw then I will lay it down and use the compound but I don't have to do that unless the crown is larger than about 6".
Mike O.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike:
Thanks for posting that. I was going to post something like that, but I couldn't get my brain and fingers to work together to explain what I wanted to say. A photo would explain it real simple, but putting it to words....
You did good.
Phil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can buy a jig for that as well and it makes cutting them a piece of cake.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving


"Another Phil" <NoSpamming@one two three four five.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1. Cope the inside joints (mitering is fine for outside joints). 2. No need to glue the corners if they're properly cut. You *might* have to use a bit of putty to fill in any gaps (assuming you're painting afterward). 3. Get another person to assist you in holding the molding up for a test fit. Then it won't matter so much about center-out/corners-in nailing. Just make sure you know exactly where your wall studs and ceiling joists are -- they are your friends!
I put up crown molding in my daughter's room last year (first molding project), and though it was VERY frustrating at first, I was pretty comfortable with the process by the end. Good luck! (Buy several extra feet of molding and PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE your coping!).
Silk wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, what did you do for the ceiling joist that ran parallel to the wall?
Darrell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Everyone has given you good advice and I agree with the suggestion to cope the inside corners. For some reason (being right handed) I find it easier to cope the left end of my pieces. So I will work around the room from left to right and will have only one cope from the other direction if the room is a simple square If the room has an outside corner, I will probably end there because I can hold the coped piece up and mark the outside corners from each direction. Starting to nail from the middle and leaving the ends loose is a great suggestion and allows you to move the piece up or down in the corner if needed. I always glue and nail the outside corners. Depending on how big the crown is, you may be able to nail near the middle of the crown and hit the top plate of your wall. Nailing near the bottom will allow you to hit the wall studs. Nailing through the top of the crown will let you hit the joists or trusses on the two walls where you have them.
Mike O.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Last night on DYI show with David Thiel he had a way cool jig setup for doing crown molding so you don't get confused when installing them....here's a link for it...makes doing crown molding easier
http://www.diynet.com/diy/hi_tools/article/0,2037,DIY_13936_3387707,00.html
Tina
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
And what about what to nail too? For example, for the vertical wall there are studs every 16 inches (we hope). But how about the ceiling. Some joint run perpendicular to the wall and some parallel. Will there be a place to nail to for the wall with the parallel ceiling joist?
Darrell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

not be a place to nail into a rafter if the rafters are parallel to the wall. Such is life. Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi Silk,
I have done quite a lot of crown for myself and friends/relatives- I am not a pro.
If you do not cope the inside corners, your work will look like an amateur did it. It will look ok, but 'cheesey'.
Cope, cope, cope.....it's worth the time and little extra expense (in waste).
Lou
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.