Crown molding installation question

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I am about to install crown molding in my house but I have never done that before. I think I got the cutting part down but I am not sure about the installation part. Any one has ideas about what the best way to install them? Is it better to nail it from the corners in or from the center out? On the mitered corners will nails be enough or should I glue the corners as well (regular wood glue is good for that)? If anyone can help I will appreciate it.
Thanks.
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I am about to install crown molding in my house but I have never done that before. I think I got the cutting part down but I am not sure about the installation part. Any one has ideas about what the best way to install them? Is it better to nail it from the corners in or from the center out? On the mitered corners will nails be enough or should I glue the corners as well (regular wood glue is good for that)? If anyone can help I will appreciate it.
Thanks.
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I
I assume you're using coped joints on the inside corners. Nail it in the center, and leave the butt end with a little give. When you join the butt end with a new coped piece on the inside corners, you'll be able to marry the 2 pieces if the butt end has a little give.
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I will not be coping the inside corners. I will be using a regular miter cut.
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Using mitered inside corners for CM is an amateur's mistake. You'll get far better results if you learn to cut a coped joint. It will take about an hour investment.
Marrying a coped joint is actually a lot easier than getting a mitered joint to fit, and that joint won't open up on you over time. They are also more forgiving and adjustable if you corners aren't square and plumb. Coped joints also give you more structural integrity.
If you're not convinced by now.....
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He's right Silk. A small cost for a coping saw (type of hand jigsaw) and you'll be able to make crown molding corner joints that look great. When people come into your home and see the crown molding, the corners are the first thing they will look at. And it is a very small investment of your time to learn how to do it properly. There's a number of small tricks you can use to speed up the process like scribing with compass.
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I'll third that emotion. Learning to cope isn't all that difficult and you'll (the OP) be proud of your work. Mitered joints will open up.
Dave
Upscale wrote:

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Ah, but what some don't tell you about coping is the importance of the coping saw blade. Go to a real hardware store and get a coping saw blade from Vermont American. They have a narrow very high tooth count blade that is great for coping. Metal cutting blade, and mount so cuts on down stroke.
Also check out Amazon tools: (Amazon.com product link shortened)18699954/sr=1-7/ref=sr_1_7/103-9714539-8974211?v=glance&s=hi {watch out for line wrap.) Vermont American 48579 6-3/8" x 32 TPI Coping Saw Blade 2 Pack
Oh, and one last suggestion, which I am sure you know and I am only reminding you about, take room measurements WHERE THE CM IS BEING INSTALLED. Don't assume the measurement at waist high is the same as the ceiling. And use the exact same measuring tape you measured the room to also measure the cuts on the wood. Trust me, too short by 1/8 inch is noticeable in CM, and your error will be visited upon more than once over the years by she who never forgets.
Phil

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Thanks for all the advice guys. I will give coping a second thought. I talked to a few people who told me to stay away from coping since it's simply too much problems and that's why I decided to miter my corners. I see that there is a different view on this issue here.
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What do those "few people" do for a living or a hobby??
Dave
Silk wrote:

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I talked to a guy who does that for a living as well as a few guys who just did it in their home. They suggested that since I am an amateur (new homeowner so I am new to all these DIY stuff), I should not try to cope. My understanding from them is that a good mitered corner looks like a good coped corner. I played with some scrap until I got the angles right. The main problem for me was doing outside bull nose cuts, but I got that right by trial an error. All the tips I got from you guys are good. If you can think of any more little secrets of the trade I am willing to learn. As I said I am still new at this but it is a lot of fun.
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The guy who does it for a living is trying to bolster his image, that's all. I'm not a "pro", but I got "pro" results my first time out with crown molding. Just practice on scrap! "Amateurs" can cope unless they have no manual dexterity and no guidance (on site, or from reading text and illustrations).
Dave
Silk wrote:

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additional info: for tools, all you need is a coping saw and round and flat files. a dremel tool can get away from you. a SMALL plane can also be used on the straight portions of the profile to adjust the bevelled edge to clear the adjacent board.
One book that's handy on the subject: Finish Carpentry - best of fine homebuilding.
Dave
Silk wrote:

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more
still
Some coping instructions will tell you to cut right on the line with the saw. I get better results by cutting just shy (e.g. 1/32") of the line, and then taking a very sharp Stanley knife and trimming up to the line. Then the resulting profile is very sharp. Otherwise the saw blade can leave a ragged edge.
If I can, I hang the pieces making up the outside corners first, since I find them to be more exacting.
If you have a long run and need to splice 2 pieces, read up on scarf joints.
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A couple more things: Take the time to clearly mark your studs and ceiling members, and try and figure out where your electricity runs. Hit the former two with nails and avoid the latter.
Also, I like to mark with a pencil along the wall and ceiling every few feet and at the corners where the CM should lie (the spring angle). Otherwise it can wander up or down and twist on you a bit if you're not careful.
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Sure coping is harder than cutting miters. But learning to right a bicycle is tougher than learning to cut copes.
If you're going to goop the joints with caulk and paint, and if you pick material less prone to movement and if you live in a house that's fairly stable, then your mitered joints will probably be just fine.
I need to do CM in my house and I can pass most of the above caveats. My approach is going to be to give coping a try for a hour or three. If I still can't get the hang of it, then I'll miter and goop and paint.
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Actually your plan won't work long term. seasonal movement will open up the caulked joints, big time. Even if they look good short term, they'll look like hell with a season or two.
Dave
Patrick Conroy wrote:

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Agreed - but (a) we live in a low and fairly constant humidity environment and (b) if I'm going to paint, I'd probably try some non-solid-wood CM stock.
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That should mitigate the problem.
Dave
Patrick Conroy wrote:

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My
Choice of caulk matters. Look for "elastomeric" caulk at "your local home center".
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