Crosscut Sleds?

I'm curious if anyone sells crosscut sleds commercially for a tablesaw?
I tried to build one out of plywood with poplar runners (what I had available), but I wasn't real happy with it. For starters, it weighs more than most of the panels I'm trying to cut, so it's not real convenient to use.
I originally built it with runners to fit both miter slots, but couldn't get it aligned well enough to let it slide smoothly. So, I cut it down a bit to reduce the size and weight, but the wood runner I made doesn't fit my miter slot very well.
Anyway, I'm curious if anyone sells these things commercially for a decent price?
I've seen sliding tables, which would be nice, but they take up more space than I have available.
Thanks,
Anthony
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www.jointech.com
Look at the Smart Miter. A little pricey, but it works great.

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Try this link... http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID &26
There was an aluminum sled for sale some years ago, but I can't remember where. Tom

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I made this exact sled, although I didn't buy the kit. I've tried the plastic runners in the past and have never been happy with them. I used two sets of Incra miter sliders instead. I have never had any problem with them such as suggested by Larry, in a response below. I can't recall if there are three "slop adusting" set screws, but since I routinely crosscut up to 24" wide pieces and never have a problem, I'm guessing there must be 3. I've used this sled for every project for the last 18 months and never had to readjust the sliders - they are dead-on and have no play at all.
If you're not sure what the big advantage of the Incra miter sliders is, it is because you are able to adust the fit of the sliders perfectly AFTER the sled is constructed. You also have enough adjustability (if you build the sled within some tolerances) to make the sled perfectly square even after you've glued it up. They really are worth the $$.
Mike

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My Incra miter has three of the "adjustable" slop eliminators on its bar. They do work as advertized but even with three, there still is the slight "jump" to the side as each adjuster in turn is relieved from the miter slot. Not a big deal but not ideal either. My guess is the miter bar is designed for the slightly narrower "Craftman" saw miter slots. The larger slots (Unisaw in my case) need the adjusters. A better approach would be to somehow have the miter bar split in the center so that each side maintains full contact with the walls of the miter slot.
If the table saw sled being built uses two miter bars, mounting them with the adjusters opposed would work. They could then be installed so the non-adjustable faces make the miter slot contact and the adjusters are used for controlling slide friction and keeping the bars in position.
The adjustability is nice since the fit can be made very tight for top accuracy (at the cost of higher pushing force required). or relaxed for easy gliding (at the cost of reduced accuracy). Fixed width bars could do ome or the other but not both.
-BR
Mike in Mystic wrote:

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Several companies sell sleds, including Delta,Jointech, Incra, and several more.
I would build a single runner jig out of 1/2" plywood.
I would order a set of miter sliders from Woodpeckers or one of the magazines and have a smooth slider in a short while.
Here is your plywood: http://www.woodpeck.com/balticbirch.html
and here are the sliders:
http://www.woodpeck.com/tmiterchannel.html
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snipped-for-privacy@WORLDNET.ATT.NET says...

A word of caution. I bought Incra miter sliders a while back. Unless they've changed, they only have two adjustments, each fairly near an end. If very much of the slider is off the table, all the free play comes back.
I wrote them and suggested a third adjustment in the middle, but didn't get a response. But they may have done it, I haven't looked lately.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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I have the 24" sliders that have 3 adjusters. The shorter (18" I think) may have only 2.
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Phillip Hansen
Skil-Phil Solutions
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http://www.woodhaven.com/detail.aspx?ID 12
Haven't used it. In fact, I've never seen one, but ran across the page when looking at something someone else posted regarding a bandsaw fence. Woodhaven makes great products.
I've made several of my own, borrowing liberally from the archived wisdom of the collective. They work well.
Patriarch.
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Don't see anyone suggesting WoodHaven yet. I like the *looks* of their sleds. Don't have one tho'.

Aye! Hear ya' there.

As did my first one. Sled V2 is much nicer as I adjusted my technique. I spend quite a bit of time fitting the stock to the slots. I go slow and really sneak up on a tight fit. I also dimension a nice sized chunk of Oak so I have material to make more runners as needed.
I also waxed the underside of my sled and the runners. That helped.
When putting the sled on the runners, did you (a) make the runners height "less deep" that the slots? (b) lift the runners up a smidge by putting a penny or two under them? (c) place them in their runners with dbl stick tape on top and then drop the sled on them? (d) slide the sled and runners forward, but still in the slots, then attach a screw at the front; then slide them backward, but still in the slots and attach a screw at the back?
Those TipLets helped me out.
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wrote:

I just posted about a sled I built to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking under the header a good cheap table saw sled.
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Woodhaven definitely sells them pre-made or as kits
John
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Not aware of commercially avalible sleds, but mitre sliders are avalible for this purpose. DAGS 'incra miter slider'
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Most of them will feature mitering as well as cut-off. I guess the granddaddy of them all is the Dubby. Found here: http://www.in-lineindustries.com /
But my advice is to save your money and work on your skills. You really should be able to build a successful sled.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

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Absolutely, The Dubby from In-Line Industries. I have both left and right sides. These sleds are large enough to cut decent sized plywood panels and accurately. For $90 more than the Jointech model, you get "two" sleds with twice the capacity of the Jointech.
http://www.in-lineindustries.com /

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I just made one almost exactly like you described, A-C ply with poplar runners and poplar from and back braces.. I made the runner to fit right but getting it aligned can be tricky. Mine sticks a little but that's better than being sloppy. You can buy metal runners if you're having a problem milling the runners yourself or they do make them commercially. I was just looking at a catalog last night that had them in, forget the name. Someone who sells mostly router stuff. I think it was Woodhaven.
OK, I found it....it is woodhaven
http://www.woodhaven.com/SubTableSawSleds.aspx

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These are probably obvious tips to experienced woodworkers, but having recently made several sleds for various purposes, I discovered an easy way to cut runners precisely. In the past, I'd shave down 3/4" stock and rip off the runners. But I discovered that an easier way is to get some 1/4" oak stock from HD and rip the runners flat. The runners don't fit all the way down in the slot, but they shouldn't anyway.
I set the sled base down on the runners, square with the back of the table, and screw from the top. Then I make an initial kerf and set the fence square to that, with a screw on one end and a clamp on the other until I make a test crosscut to check the square.
I'll bet the commercial sleds are great to use, but I wanted the practice, because I figured that if I couldn't build a decent sled, I might not do too well with more difficult projects.
On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 14:24:02 +0000, HerHusband wrote:

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