Crosscut sled opinions

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Greetings and Happy Holidays to All, I would like to start making a crosscut sled for my Unisaw and would like opinions from those who have made their own. Yes, I did Google and found 1090 entries. After looking through a lot of them (a group of Google hits = a gaggle?) I have some good ideas. I'm still debating on the runner material. Since I'm a diemaker, I have access to a machine shop and a lot of metal. I guess I could make the runners from steel or aluminum, since where I live we do have humidity swings. That would also let me put discs into the ends so it won't lift, something I didn't think of before I gaggled. As for size, I plan on a medium size due to the work I plan on using it for. If it works out, I can always make another size later. Anyone make one with a feature they are really proud of and would like to share with the rest of the class??? BTW, I already watched part of the video at Taunton.com. It would be great if someone knows of a link to an online plan to download. Thanks as always, Mark
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I use both commercial metal "miter sliders" and hardwood runners on my many TS sleds. For quickie or specific purpose sleds I may not use often (perhaps to cut a large sheet at an angle) , I always use hardwood runners, but for precision applications and sleds I plan on keeping for a while and will see much use, I personally prefer the adjustable, metal "miter sliders".
With these, I can adjust out any slop caused by weather changes. They allow me a little extra precision that I do not have with the wooden runner sleds. They also come with some pretty handy tips for making the sled square to the blade ... but you pay the price.
Like me, you may find yourself using both, but don't discount the adjustable metal runners until you try them. If you wish, you can see pictures for the two sleds I use the most on my website, jigs and fixtures page.
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I took a little tour of your shop, am damn jealous. Very nice setup you have there. Quality tools are the only way to go. Thanks, Mark
Swingman wrote:

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Thank you, Mark. I'm thankful for what I have, and would never consider mentioning a bigger shop to SWMBO. ;>)
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I have been to your site also always nice to see a serious woodworkers shop. What do you do to support your addiction, eraghm I mean habit, oh sorry, I meant your hobby <G> I would like to mention that you could avoid using the mitre slot rig with a slot cutter for your router I use it all the time differant thickness's and also one that is 5/32 for biscuits. Thought I would mention it on case you overlooked it as an option. George

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"George M. Kazaka" wrote in message

shop.
I
I own, or am a partner in, three different businesses, still play/tour music professionally, and make a bit of furniture ... mostly for myself, but also for a select, but growing client list. Life is, more or less, beautiful ... so far.

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and
Thanks ... I do use a slot cutter on the router table for long splines, and a plate jointer for reinforcing miter joints with biscuits ... although I have used the slot cutter with a stop to do that also.
I use the jig you saw for visibile splines with contrasting wood on miter joints ... it's a lot faster setup on the TS.
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In rec.woodworking

I used delrin for runners and I'm very happy with it. Here's a pic though you can't see the runners. You can see the end of a T-slot for my adjustable stop block.
http://home.swbell.net/snaphook/Pics/cc_sled.jpg
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Hmm... T-slot in the rear fence. I like it. Think I'll borrow the idea. Thanks, Mark
Bruce wrote:

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Mark wrote:

Bolt-on miter and finger accessories. I'll probably have more before it's over. I'm working up a whole modular system of sled-riding gadgets.
Of course I *need* to more than you. My saw is a piece of crap, and I can't get any accuracy out of it unless I ride both slots and both outside edges of the table, hold my mouth right, and curl my left big toe.
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Well just get out there and do it then. A simple one shouldn't take more than an afternoon, then you can get using it and see wht's really important to you. You can always make another one later.

Sounds dreadful ! I have a big top on my saw (and I paid good money to make it like that) so having to slide it out of the front of the slot rather than lifting it up would really annoy me. I also have blind-ended blade-containing boxes on my crosscut sled, so you can't simply slide it over a blade.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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I once saw an interesting variation on a sled. Take two miter gauges (one in each slot) and screw a piece of wood cross the two of them. Perhaps not as nice a real sled, but you can make one in under 5 minutes and it's a lot better than just a regular miter gauge.
Of course, that assumes you've got two miter gauges laying around.
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Roy Smith wrote:

Umm, five, six, maybe seven. One came with each machine.
UA100
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Keith, Keith -- these people just don't understand that kind of talk.
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Ross
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Ross rote:

sigh...
UA100
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Unisaw A100 wrote:

What, are you only counting the bandsaw miter gauges?
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Nova wrote:

Let's see.
The Atlas No. 912 (12" 50's vintage) came with a gage.
Neither of the 30's vintage 10" Deltas have a miter slot so no gage.
The 16" Wallace didn't have a slot so ditto for it.
The 14" Delta ('48 vintage) didn't come with a gage but has a slot.
There are the two 30's vintage 12" Deltas which aren't slotted so no gage.
The Powermatic No. 141 (made in McMinnville and not by Chinese orphans and political prisoners) has a slot but no gage.
Nope, most of my gages came with table saws and sanders. I did receive one from OWWMer Dave Potts. It is a second generation Delta (very late 30's/very early 40's). I'm still on the lookout for a first generation for El Guapo just to have it finished out correctly.
UA100
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Roy Smith wrote:

Depends on why you're building the sled. If it's to try to force a bad saw to do something moderately useful, the two gauge trick probably won't work.
That's what I tried first, except the second miter gauge was just a rail attached to the fence. Similar principle. It was still way too sloppy.
The sled I built rides in both slots, and also along the outside edges of the table. That gets me 90ish degrees, and that's as high as the bar goes on this boat anchor.
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Mine is a single side sled, well actually more of a panel cutter. I made mine with an adjustable fence for cutting angles. I've never moved it from 90 degrees, hahahaha. Simple to route a curved grove in an arc for the fence angel adjustment.
Mine is 3/4" ply, if I did it again, I'd use 1/2". I've seen guys use 1/4" but it's too light for me.
I envy your ability to make dead on metal runners. I have the Incra adjustable ones and they just aren't the same as a good zero/zero fit.
One last suggestion, I'd look at adding some measuring ability with stop blocks. Take a look at http://www.woodpeck.com/shopstopfence.html If you decide to consider this method, call them as ask if they can get you the flip stop style fence. The ability to flip the stop out of the way would be very handy. At the very least, make sure you fence is tall and square enough to clamp a stop block for repetative cuts. Mine is used mainly for cutting plywood panels, so my fence is low and nicely rounded to make the top edges more ergonomic. I didn't consider that I'd want to clamp things to it, so now it's difficult to clamp a stop block to it's nicely rounded edges. Live and learn, hahaha.
Bernie

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Yeah, I brought my gage blocks home from work today so I can get the sizes of both miter slots. I'm pretty sure they won't both be the exact same width. I'm going to go with a couple of cold rolled steel runners, I can get to within a half thou of the size I'll need. I'm also working on a jig similar to the ones used to check squareness and parallelism on table saws. Mark
Bernie Hunt wrote:

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No special features on mine, but my sliders are made of UHMW (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene). It is very rigid and stays pretty slick so it slides well in the tracks. This is where I found it http://ttrackusa.com/mitertrack.html

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