crosscut sled


For making the runners out of wood, is there a preference for how the runner cross section is oriented when cutting from s4s flat sawn lumber. Should the 3/4 width of the runner be from the 3/4 thickness of the stock, or from the width of the stock then sized to 3/8 from there? Or does it really matter?
-- SwampBug - - - - - - - - - - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Should the 3/4 width of

Probably won't make a whole lot of difference. You won't get much cup in 3/4" width. If the board is flat sawn, I would probably cut 3/8" off the edge (3/4" thick dimension). A bigger problem is finding a board straight enough that you don't get a bow, or worse yet, twist in the strip. I found a very straight piece of quarter sawn hickory, thickness planed it to exactly 3/4", then ripped off a bunch of 3/8" thick strips. I have used these in several sleds with good results.
--
Ken Vaughn
Visit My Workshop: http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65 /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks Ken, a "been there" bit of advice goes a long way. I have some red oak which should be ok for the job. I will marry that with 1/2" Baltic birch plywood. 2x4 SYP should suffice for the fences. I want to make it a double runner for at least 18" panel cutting. Any further suggestions are welcome.
--
SwampBug
- - - - - - - - - - - -
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oak will work well. I also used some stable SYP in two of my sleds and it has worked fine. Only suggestion I can think of is to elevate the runners in the miter gauge slots so that you get a good tight fit between the Baltic Birch or MDF deck and the runners when you install the screws.
I have seen suggestions as to using pennies to elevate the runner -- I used some Formica scrap and cut thin strips. I don't use any glue between the runner and the sled deck, it always seems to seep out and cause drag, and ultimately must be scraped off with a chisel or scraper. After completing the runner installation, run a pencil along the inside of the miter gauge slots to mark the runner and show where it needs to be scraped. When done, wax the runners and bottom of deck.
--
Ken Vaughn
Visit My Workshop: http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65 /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

SYP was used for fence, as you suggest, not for runners, as might be interpreted from my reply. Southern Yellow Pine can be very hard and stable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I understood, thanks.
--
SwampBug
- - - - - - - - - - - -
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The one time I saw it discusses, they suggested the growth rings go vertical - perpendicular to the table top. That said, I haven't worried about mine. I live in a low humidty area and shellac them...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
low humidity is a dream here is swamp country. . .<s> That makes sense in context with another comment concerning QS wood. A simple project fraught with possible blunders, , ,interesting!
--
SwampBug
- - - - - - - - - - - -
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Saw Ken's comments on SYP for the fence. My Sled #2 - used primed, 1x6"x6' MDF from the 'Depot. Cost was about $3, IIRC. Cut it in half and glued it into a 2x6"x3' fence. Nuthin' flatter than MDF. 'Cept of course...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cept of cource whatever you set it on during glue up. . .right? <s>
--
SwampBug
- - - - - - - - - - - -
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is worth using QS material IMO. It will change less across the width, which is critical, with the seasons. Depth of the runner is less important and seasonal changes won't matter. I like White Oak or Maple. I don't think Red Oak is as good as a slider, but haven't really tried it. My best tip is, make a bunch of runners to fit your slots while you are at it. Only takes a few minutes extra and you will find a use for them on other sleds.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
For making the runners out of wood, is there a preference for how the runner cross section is oriented when cutting from s4s flat sawn lumber. Should the 3/4 width of the runner be from the 3/4 thickness of the stock, or from the width of the stock then sized to 3/8 from there? Or does it really matter?
-- SwampBug - - - - - - - - - - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can be real selective with the grain on the runners. And while i can't have true QS, i can select from flatsawn and cut as Ken suggested for a close second best. . .I think! I could also use straight grain fir but I don't know how stable it is compared to the oak I have.
--
SwampBug
- - - - - - - - - - - -
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Vertical grain fir is very stable but tends to splinter. I used aluminum and hard rock maple, both worked fine. Slightly chamfer the long edges, top and bottom.
Dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"hard rock maple". . .sounds like a candy.<g> I've had the fir for ages. . .might put it to use.
--
SwampBug
- - - - - - - - - - - -
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.