Cross cutting a dado

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Actually, that part of the floor is pretty close to dead level. (It should have a practically undetectable slope outward, but that's not how they guy laid it.)

I wouldn't want to go much longer than 6' unless I had a huge side table like Norm. It's a trick keeping everything tight to the fence and flat to the table.

I did those checks too. It's always fun to see how a new (to me) joining method works out. The ultimate fit, all 8 boards on the 2 supports looked good. Time for final sanding and glue.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 3/11/2010 1:43 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Level Floors I am the one who suggested the rolling work bench for a side table. I have used this same table and saw three different garages of signficant diferent ages. I have found that even if the floor is not quite level it does not make a lot of difference. Unless you are working with thick materials that do not bend, most wood will easily bend a quarter to a half an inch over the lenght of the piece.
Practically this means that your side table can differ in height from the saw by that much and there will be no problem. You may have to lift the end of the board a little when you reach the table, but practically it does not effect the purpose of the side table which is to support long pieces of wood.
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If you Lift the end of the board when you reach the table, it seems to me you are not getting a square cut at the blade. Maybe I'm nit picking, but I like anything going through fast moving tools to be flat on the tool's table.
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On 3/11/2010 9:34 PM, LDosser wrote:

It will be flat on the saw table, and can be maintained square to the fence. When I said lift the piece I meant lift the end up slightly to get it to slid on to the table. This can be done by hand or a slight incline at the edge of the table. The natural spring of the board will allow the board to lay flat on the saw table and have the end a little higher than the table. I am only talking about less than a half inch in 4 to 6 feet.
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Puckdropper wrote:

--------------------------------- Here is a quick & dirty solution that might interest you.
http://tinyurl.com/y9oyhuy
Lew
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I like that one. Thanks!
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I do too! I probably would have used it if I knew about it.
Puckdropper
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Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 3/9/2010 7:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Clamp a piece of plywood to the crossmember of a sawhorse. Not elegant or sturdy or in any way graceful, but it will do in a pinch. If no ply then clamp on a couple of boards of any reasonable dimension and put a third across the top.
Or stack books, scrap lumber, or whatever else you need to use on a folding card table.
Or clamp something in a Workmate.
Or live dangerously and stack some bricks/gallon jugs/barbell weights/shot bags/unabridged dictionaries on the board to hold it down (keep them away from the blade--use a clamp across the board as a fence if you have to). That's a no good for narrow stock but the sides of a book case should be wide enough to hold them stably.
Or make a crosscut sled with a hold-down and enough weight to manage your boards.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

I recently cut dadoes on the 7' sides of a bookcase. I used a 3/4" straight bit in my router and a clamp-on cutting guide. The 3/4" poplar shelves were so snug in the 1/4"-deep dadoes I had to sand them a bit so they would fit.
If I had a table-saw I'd use a couple of adjustable roller stands (which I do have) and a hunk of plywood to support the other end of the work piece.
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On Mar 9, 7:13am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Human helper. Cost = 1 case beer.
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On 3/9/2010 10:28 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

That tends to need to scratch his noise at the worst possible, about half way through the cut, or gets distracted by the bug on the wall and watches it and lets the board bind in the saw.
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er<puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

The helper's job is to support the weight of the board, not steer it. Supporting the weight of a shelf standard only takes one hand. He can pick his nose or drink a beer with the other.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

I have a bunch of roller stands for this sort of thing and a short roller conveyor. I would suggest if your table saw has two square slots like mine that you make a shuttle that rides in both grooves in order to keep such long boards square while making your dado cuts also. The roller stands where cheap, but I have had them for years. Don't know what they would cost today.
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