Cross cut sled with Blade guard?

Hs anyone ever made a crosscut sled that keeps the factory blade guard? I have e PM66, and am considering making one. I think its possible by creating a large "bridge" over the highest point the guard goes on the back side of the sled?
Any opinions?
hda
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Why not just use a piece of lexan from front fence to back fence over the top of the blade? I put one on the miter sled I built ... picture on the jigs and shop fixtures page. Seems like it serves the same purpose with a lot less fuss.
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Last update: 8/24/03
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A.I. wrote:

More trouble than it's worth. It'll bang against the front fence and make through cuts impossible. Scrap the OEM guard and make an inverted box type guard that drops into grooves cut into the front and rear fences.
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On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 20:03:37 -0400, "A.I."

Yes, but only a tiny one. It was like the usual sled design, but "single-sided". The fence stayed entirely in front of the blade and the back of the sled had an open slot for the blade. I made the fence twice as thick (2x 3/4" ply) and kept the sled's table narrow to maintain some rigidity,
It didn't work as a real crosscut sled, but it was handy for accurate chop-off work in 2"x2"s.
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