Cross Cut Sled Fence - Bowed At Kerf

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On Tuesday, February 10, 2015 at 11:16:11 AM UTC-8, Dan Coby wrote:

If I care about alignment (usually do, in any jig), I predrill and drive one nail as a pivot, then glue the piece into position. When the glue is set, before using the assembly, I predrill and screw along the glue joint so it won't break. Optionally, also remove the nail...
This allows me to get good results even with hotmelt glue (which allows later disassembly for adjustment). Predrilling is key, a bit of woodgrain can cock a sheetrock screw badly, and has some effect even on shanked woodscrews.
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I have seen the same thing happen in various situations, where putting a screw in the center pulls a piece out of line. It's always better to work from one end to the other, or from the center out to both ends, than it is to do the ends and then the center.
John
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"DerbyDad03" wrote:
I bent down and looked under the sled and saw the single screw I had placed in the center area of the fence. As soon as I removed that screw, the bow disappeared and the fence is now once again flat across the face. ---------------------------------------------- As others have suggested, too small a pilot hole and 3/4" stock requires screws to be dead nuts on center, which leaves very little for error.
SFWIW, I use 75% of full body dia for pilot drill dia.
Haven't stripped a screw yet.
Lew
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