creating cornerblocks for crown molding


Hi,
I have been attempting to recreate a cornerblock for crown molding that I picked up at a hardware store. I was somewhat successful when I built them a while back but the angles were not quite accurate but it was close enough. I regretfully didn't write down the angles and I am having a hard time duplicating it. I would just purchase them but every time I see them they look like crap. Poorly made. The typical angles for outside corners do not seem to be working for me. If anyone knows of the correct bevel and miter angles to build this corner block I would be most appreciative. I already have the top square part constructed. I am including a link to a picture I took of the only decent one I found a while back to model off of. Thanks everyone!
http://www.patmedia.net/marklevinson/cornerblock.htm
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On 1 Jun 2005 11:48:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I don't know what the angles would be on a table saw but on a chop saw it's not hard to do but might be a little more difficult to explain.
The side that goes against the wall is of course a 90 degree cut and the other end is 45. Place the piece of crown upside down on your chop saw at the angle at which it fits the wall and ceiling. You can kinda rock the piece up and down until it seems to fit squarely. The back of the bottom detail should be flat against the back fence of the chop saw. It's just like it's laying on the wall except upside down. Imagine that the back fence on the saw is the wall and the bottom is the ceiling. Turn the saw to 45 and make the cut. You should have the outside angle now. Next just lay the piece flat on the saw (face up) with the bottom towards you. You will be able to see the where the angle (you just cut) runs out on the flat part on the back of the crown. Make your square cut where the angle meets the straight part of the back. That should be one side. Do the same thing again with the saw turned to the opposite 45.
If I haven't explained that well enough email me and I can try again.
I might suggest that if you can make the block look good, you can probably make the inside corner look good without the block.
Mike O.
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Thanks Mike,
I had been attempting to cut the molding flat on my miter saw with the very angles suggested on the altereagle.com site which did not work for me. I will try the cuts with the molding set in the saw as it would sit on the wall/ceiling and see how that goes!
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Much easier...make a backing block to set the moulding against as well will also help a bunch.
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How about this? Cheers, JG
http://www.altereagle.com/Crown_molding.html
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Nice link.
While we're talking about crown moulding....
I'm doing my first trim project here soon. Adding trim pieces to kitchen cabinetry. Everything but the crown seems pretty straightforward.
In a few places the crown moulding will butt to walls that will have no crown moulding. I considered just having it span the perimeter of the room but there would definitely be some runs where it would look extremely awkward so I decided against that.
My current thinking is to cope a small piece (2 inches or so) to those butts and have a return miter cap the end of that small piece. So the walls with no crown would actually have this small piece on them. This seems to me to be nicer than just butting to the wall.
What would ordinarily be done here?
thanks for comments ml
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On Thu, 2 Jun 2005 15:00:19 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Just butting to the wall is what's normally done. If I understand what you are doing, you are turning the mold along the wall with a short piece and then butting to the wall with the return.....? I've never had anyone ask me to do that but if the look appeals to you, go for it.
Mike O.
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