creating an expanding-height stud

I want to put up a sort of lightweight temporary wall, supported by a "temporary" stud pushing up into a (concrete slab) ceiling and down into the carpet. So I'm trying to think of the best way to make it push up on the ceiling and down on the floor--a sort of reverse turnbuckle. Ideas so far:
--Mount small L-bracket into ceiling, cut stud a half-inch short of ceiling. Use pry bar to push stud down into carpet while connecting L-bracket to stud. Put male Velcro on bottom of stud so it will adhere to carpet.
--Cut stud a quarter-inch short of the full height, then cut it at a 45-degree angle in the middle. Use radiator clamp or similar to make the two angles slide past each other until stud presses against both ceiling and carpet.
--Cut stud an eighth-inch short of the full height, then use door shims (one from each side) to compress it between ceiling and carpet.
--Cut stud three inches short of full height, put a big lag screw in the bottom end, and unscrew that until it presses down on a 4x4 block resting on the carpet. Could use a hex bolt and nut rather than a lag screw.
Comments on these, or altogether new ideas are welcomed.
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Mr Downtown <"Mr Downtown"> wrote in

Why not use one of those house jack poles? I'm not sure what they're called, but they're metal poles installed under beams to hold the floor up. Depending on how they're constructed, you might be able to drill a 1-2" hole in the top of your temporary wall and put the screw adjustment piece through it.
Without knowing your specific purpose, it's going to be difficult to suggest alternate solutions or point to one that may be better.
Puckdropper
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For decorative reasons, I'd like to put a slightly curved wall in one corner of my condo living room. Because someday I'll sell it to someone who might not want a curved wall in the same place, I'd like to make it easily removable. The curved surface will be about 84 inches wide by roughly 94 tall, and the curve will be about 45 degrees of arc.
I have read about this Neatform Bendy MDF, which sounds like the easiest way for me to get a smooth-surface curved wall. But it sounds relatively flimsy, so I thought it best to put up two or three "studs" between my concrete slab ceiling and my carpeted floor. One of them will be at the seam in the two pieces of Bendy (it comes 48 inches wide). I'm just trying to think of a simple way to get the studs to stand up straight without a lot of precise fitting or digging into either ceiling or floor. The curve prevents me from using a traditional channel on the ceiling. At one point I considered making a curved "plate" of 3/4-inch plywood to put on ceiling and floor to describe the curve, but that would be pretty heavy and difficult to suspend from the ceiling using lead anchors. The ceiling has a popcorn finish that I want to disturb as little as possible, as it's difficult to restore.
I will look into house jacks, but they seem like a bit of overkill. Having the "stud" not move is more important than having it in compression; compression is just a way to get it to stay in place. Presumably there's no deflection in either ceiling or floor slab.
I figured I would just use drywall screws to attach the Bendy to the studs. The extreme ends of the Bendy will probably be attached with Velcro to molding fitted to the existing drywall--Velcro so I can easily pry it loose and get behind it to remove it without a wrecking bar. I'll do my best to cut it so it sort of friction fits between ceiling and carpet, and eventually will try to figure out how to bend a simple baseboard enough to match the curve. In an ideal world, I'd carefully fit the edge of the Bendy to whatever existing imperfections are in the existing drywall, but that may be a bit ambitious for me. The Bendy will be a contrasting color to the rest of the wall, so it will read as a different volume.
This is a project that has to be done in the living room itself, pretty much with hand tools, although I am thinking of buying a circular saw or maybe a Rotozip to cut the long runs on the Bendy.
What about this honest inquiry seems like trolling?
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"Mr Downtown" wrote:

Build it as a slip in plug.
Layout the curve in 3/4 ply for the top and bottom pieces.
Cut 2x4 studs and install so they follow curve.
Cover curved surface with 1/4" poplar bending plywood.
Attach assembly to wall with brackets made from 3/4 ply and 2x4s, then level out and trim out with moldings of choice.
Reverse process to remove (Maybe an hour's work at most)
Have fun
Lew
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Mr Downtown" <"Mr Downtown wrote:

Seems like a lot of work _________

Might work but I'd think they wouldn't slide very easily ___________

Easy __________
Better to use a T-nut in bottom and a bolt.
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dadiOH
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On Aug 12, 12:21am, Mr Downtown <"Mr Downtown"> wrote:

What exactly is the temporary wall for? Is the idea to break it down in large-ish pieces? If so, how big?
Why wouldn't you use metal studs and just have a few screws through the top track into the ceiling/joists? Metal track top and bottom would allow about an inch or more of adjustability.
R
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Downtown"> wrote:

[snip of really rather silly ideas]

On the off-chance that this is serious, and not a troll... just go to Home Depot and buy yourself a house jack. That's *exactly* what they're made for.
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On Aug 12, 9:46am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:
owntown"> wrote:>I want to put up a sort of lightweight temporary wall, supported by a

Talk about overkill. There's no point in spending twenty bucks a pop as a substitute for a nickel in screws. The OP mentioned angle brackets being attached to the ceiling with screws, so there's no problem with building a standard wall, shimming between a doubled top or bottom plate, and screwing into the ceiling.
R
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Mr Downtown wrote:

Is this for structural purposes, or purely cosmetic? If it's cosmetic only, I would second the idea of using metal studs. Screw holes are easy to fill later.
If structural, get a jack post.
Chris
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Quit reinventing the wheel and use the oldest idea. The one carpenters have used since the dawn of time. Cut the stud(s) slightly longer than full height and pound them into place with a hammer. The top & bottom plates(or wood scraps) will protect the ceiling and floor. Art
"Mr Downtown" <"Mr Downtown"> wrote in message

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