Craftsman tablesaw (old)

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On Thu, 15 Nov 2012 20:50:36 -0800 (PST), DJayhawk
much of a factor does the belt have in performance? The belt doesn't look bad at all but the saw has been in grandpas basement shop for over 10 years unused.
When your doing your tune up make sure everything is turning freely and desn't have too much run out.
Mike M
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The blade is true and 90, but the rear part of the fence appears to run in toward the blade. That has to be where the binding is coming from.
I spent some time aligning my fence and made a couple cuts feeding really slow. It's still not cutting how I hoped it would. It maybe be that I do need to upgrade the blade.
Thanks for all the suggestions. What blade should I get?
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On Fri, 16 Nov 2012 15:20:34 -0800 (PST), DJayhawk

It's still not cutting how I hoped it would. It maybe be that I do need to upgrade the blade.

When I had my craftsman I had a systematic on it. I know some people here like the Frued. I had too measure front and back with the craftsman fence to be sure it set square.
Mike M
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On 11/16/2012 5:20 PM, DJayhawk wrote:

slow. It's still not cutting how I hoped it would. It maybe be that I do need to upgrade the blade.

While this might be hard to swallow, I recommend something like a Forrest WWII regular kerf, 40 teeth.
Yes it is expensive, $100 plus a little but it will stay sharp for a very very long time and can be resharpened dozens of times. AND if you upgrade your saw it will most likely be transferable. ;~)
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I'll vouch for that blade
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What do you guys think about blade stabilizers? There were on the saw when I started using it. Since I put the B&D blade on I reinstalled the stanilizers too. Do I need them? Do they have any effect on performance?
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On Sat, 17 Nov 2012 08:41:07 -0800 (PST), DJayhawk
started using it. Since I put the B&D blade on I reinstalled the stanilizers too. Do I need them? Do they have any effect on performance?
The threads on my arbor do not extend far enough out to allow me to use a stabilizer on the arbor side of the blade. I use one on the other side.
Definitely use them if you can, especially with a thin-kerf blade.
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On Sat, 17 Nov 2012 08:41:07 -0800, DJayhawk wrote:

They're a definite help on thin kerf blades. Opinions differ on their utility of a full kerf blade, but they can't hurt. One thing I do is mark mine so I always install them in the same position relative to each other. That might be overkill, but then again it can't hurt.
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On 11/17/12 10:41 AM, DJayhawk wrote:

I've used them on thin kerf blade and they do help. However, it's all irrelevant when your saw isn't properly set-up. The thin kerf blade with stabilizers will still flex some when the stock is binding, putting pressure against the side of the blade.
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-MIKE-

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On Sat, 17 Nov 2012 08:41:07 -0800 (PST), DJayhawk
started using it. Since I put the B&D blade on I reinstalled the stanilizers too. Do I need them? Do they have any effect on performance?
When I had my Craftsman saw I had some Craftsman stabilizers on it and they made it worse, but they likely were'nt true and created distortion in the thin kerf blade.
Mike M
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On 11/17/2012 10:41 AM, DJayhawk wrote:

started using it. Since I put the B&D blade on I reinstalled the stanilizers too. Do I need them? Do they have any effect on performance?

Blade stabilizers are a remedy for a blade with inherent deficiencies, namely thin kerf blades. Put stabilizer money towards a good regular kerf blade.
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On 11/16/12 5:20 PM, DJayhawk wrote:

run in toward the blade. That has to be where the binding is coming from.

really slow. It's still not cutting how I hoped it would. It maybe be that I do need to upgrade the blade.

There's a place near me that has a boatload of Freud - LM72R010X that they are unloading for $25 each. You could pay shipping and still have it for 1/2 of what other places are selling it. It's a heavy duty full kerf blade.
http://www.generalindustrial.com / (800) 371-2220
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On 11/16/2012 6:20 PM, DJayhawk wrote:

slow. It's still not cutting how I hoped it would. It maybe be that I do need to upgrade the blade.

When you say true, does that mean the to the slot/(table top or what ever you are using as a reference) and blade are absolutely parallel? or is the blade parallel to the fence?
One thing I just thought of if the saw has been use a lot, how are the bearings on the blade spindle. If they are worn that could cause binding and slow the saw down.
You asked about the belt, if it is going bad and causing problems I would think that those problems were that it is about to break not slow the saw down.
If the belt is to tight that could cause the bearing to bind on both the blade an in the motor causing the saw to run slow.
We have been talking about alignment, is the motor aligned with the pulley on the saw blade.
The fact that the blade is 90 degrees to the table should have nothing to do with binding.
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A good blade will make a big difference. Check to make sure the fence is parallel to the blade (it helps if it's parallel to the miter slot, but if you're not using the gauge it doesn't make too much difference.)
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 11/15/2012 11:22 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

With your cast iron top where the blade bushing assembly is bolted to that top, from my experience it is easier to use the miter slot as a reference for both the blade and the fence. Fence can move but it is difficult to move the miter slot, especially in your saw where it is a grove in the cast iron table. So if the blade is set parallel to the slot it is going to take a lot to change alignment.
Using the slot for reference makes check the fence easy. Using your adjustable square, On one end, set the square against the slot and adjust the ruler so it is against the fence. Lay the square in the same position at the other end, and adjust the fence until both ends are both the same distance from the slot.
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On 11/15/12 8:31 PM, DJayhawk wrote:

I think 1hp motor is plenty for plywood, assuming it's still in good shape. Plywood is stable and doesn't bind the blade, has no knots, is usually made mostly of soft woods. No problem with a sharp blade.
Ever try to use a dull utility knife vs. a new one. Night and day, right? Even when putting much more "horse power" behind the blade, it cuts poorly and wears you out.
I did some really nice work with a lousy table saw and a $100 blade. Like others have said, it has to be set-up properly. No blade will cut cleanly and not bog down if the fence is pinching the stock behind the blade.
Freud has some great blades for well under $75. And yes, full kerf will yield better results, but may slow down your feed rate on a 1hp motor. It's worth it, imo.
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On Thursday, November 15, 2012 6:31:00 PM UTC-8, DJayhawk wrote:

Either the alignment of the saw is bad (and the plywood is somehow binding in the cut - look for scorchmarks) or the blade is very dirty/dull, or your electrical wiring is too lightweight.
One horsepower should be enough. More than enough.
Ripping a long strip of plywood, it matters a LOT that you and your helpers feed the work straight, and keep it flat, like with a very large outfeed and/or infeed table. Usually the long rip on 8-foot sheets is done with a guide and Skilsaw, it's just easier that way.
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On 11/15/2012 9:31 PM, DJayhawk wrote:

Yesterday I was ripping a piece of 1X2, and realize there is something I do that does effect performance,
Most of the time I want very finished cuts for the type of work I am doing. To decrease the angle the teeth that the are hitting the face of the board, I adjust the height of the blade so it is about a half to three quarter inch above the board. This lower angle adds cutting teeth to the cutting length. ie as you lower the blade from full height, the angle of the blade in the wood goes from nearly vertical to nearly horizontal.
However with hard woods the greater cut length also adds to the load on the saw. If you are using a low blade height you can reduce the load by raising the blade to reduce the cut length in the wood.
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