Craftsman Table Saw ---- What's the yellow circle for?

Howdy all... Pop always said the only dumb question is the one you won't ask... What is the yellow plastic circle/plug for on the older (possibly newer) C-man a0" contractor style table saws? The plug is located in the table top right before the blade insert.
I didn't get a manual with my saw and I've wondered what it's there for. I think it has "exact cut" or something like that on it. (I'm working from memory and didn't feel like waiting till I got home to post the question.. A. Because I'd probably forget -- again and/or B. SWMBO or the youngins would keep me hoppin and I'd probably forget --- again... ;-) )
Thanks...
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It is used to indicate where you line of cut is. Use your miter gauge set at 90 degrees and cut a small amount off the end of a board. With out letting the board slip on the gauge, pull the board and gauge back until the board is covering 1/2 the yellow spot and use a pencil, fine point permanent marker, or utility knife to mark a line along the fresh cut edge of that board. Repeat for the other side of the blade.
Use the line/lines on the yellow spot for reference to align your future cuts.
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I did mine slightly different but with the same result. I took some thin stock and ran into the blade without cutting off. Bring the piece back without moving and you can mark both sides of the blade with one cut. Same result -- slightly different process to get both sides of the blade at one time.
Thom

the
permanent
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Leon wrote:

Redundant feature if you use a zero clearance throatplate.
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I used to have a similar one, years ago. The idea is that you make two marks on the yellow circle (with a sharp pencil, marking knife, awl, etc) in line with where the two sides of the blade cut, like this: | | | | Then you can (supposedly) line up a mark on your lumber to the appropriate mark on the yellow circle, and cut exactly on your mark. That's how it works in theory, anyway. In practice, it works much better to line your cut mark up to the blade itself -- while the blade is stopped, of course -- or, for crosscuts, use an *accurate* miter gauge or sled. (Hint: if it says "Craftsman" on it, it's not accurate.)
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Exac-ti-cut was the nomenclature, as memory serves, and one use has been given.
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bremen68 wrote:

I actually think it was meant to be more of a safety feature. It allows you to know where the blade will cut without lifting or removing the blade guard. I used to own a Craftsman table saw, but I never recall using the feature. That being said, some people might find it useful, and at least Sears was trying to make an improvement. It definitely does not hurt anything or get in the way.
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bremen68 wrote:

Others have described it's purpose. It's been a feature on Craftsman saws for a long time. I've seen it on a 1950's vintage "100" model Craftsman saw, which belonged to my grandfather and now sits largely unused in my brother's basement (I got the drill press and RAS, both of similar vintage). Anyway, in those days the Exacti-Cut marker had adjustable steel indexes.
Yeah, I know, I should have negotiated for the table saw, but I didn't now any better back then. Besides, I really like my Grizzly TS and it's great to have both a RAS and a TS in the shop.
Tom
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I used a straight edge and put marks for each side of the blade on mine, since I don't have the Exacticut stuff...very useful! WL

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They have had that yellow disk as long as I can remember, even in the late 50's. I use mine and like it. I would not mark it with anything other than a lead pencil though because different blades will have different widths. RM~
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Thanks for the info folks!!!
I put the saw back into my shop last night (short version - I was using my bro-in-laws Delta - he's reclaimed it, so back to the craftsman for me)
Took a look at the exacta-cut and it's a little scuffed, but nothing looks like it was marked... I'll do that as part of the final tune up...
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Ridgid TS3650 also has this feature(exacta-cut). Believe the older Craftsman Contractor Saw was made by Ridgid's parent company Emerson.
JW

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company Emerson.<<<
Right! I have one of the fewer Craftsman "made by Ryobi" contactor saws (aprox 4 yr old) made after the Emerson/Craftsman split and it also has the yellow spot. I had always thought that either craftsman or emerson had a patent on the yellow spot, guess it was a mutual deal. As a Sears retiree I got a real deal (hell of a deal) on the close out Craftsman/Ryobi saw and like it just as well as my old craftsman/emerson and some features even better. The one thing I don't like on the craftsman/ryobi are the hold down dogs attached to the splitter. I have a complete guard splitter assembly from an old craftsman that I am going to try to adapt to the new saw. If that doesn't work, guess I'll look at some after market splitters or make one from scratch. RM~
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