Craftsman router

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Rob Mills wrote:

Yup, that's the one I bought 2 years ago. Excellent machine.
--Steve
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Rob Mills wrote:

And selling for a higher price than the Bosch version, which is discounted all over the internet. <G>
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B A R R Y wrote:

When I got mine 2 years ago it was the same price either way. Don't know about now.
--Steve
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know about now.<<<
I think sears had them for $199 the last time I looked. I caught them with their britches down when I bought mine several years ago. They had them on sale for, I believe $179. I got a Craftsman club 10% discount off that then My sears retiree 10% discount off of that and walked out the door giggling. RM~
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Steve wrote:

I'm not breaking 'em off on you, but please answer a question for me.
Knowing that a particular Craftsman router is an exact, re-branded Bosch, and both are the same price, why would you choose the Craftsman version over the original?
This question has no right or wrong answer, I'm looking for your point of view.
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B A R R Y wrote:

With the Craftsman version I was able to walk out of the store with the router in my hands. With the Bosch, I would've had to wait a few days. It was just a matter of instant gratification I guess.
--Steve
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Steve wrote:

That makes sense. Thanks! <G>
I forget that I'm spoiled with so many tool dealers I can easily visit in person.
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KENDALL SEYBERT wrote:

Even if true, what difference would it make? Once melted and impurities are removed, old iron is no different from new iron. Ditto plastics.
--

dadiOH
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Chemically, perhaps. Physically, no. Woodworkers are "physicalists" in that we don't care so much about the chemical changes in our woods and metals as the physical ones.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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Puckdropper wrote:

...
That generalization is as over-generalized as the previous one (which also caught my eye)... :)
It all depends on how they're reprocessed and into what--in general plastics can't be reprocessed (economically) back into the same or similar plastics as the were originally as they are complex hydrocarbons that tend to break down.
Metals, otoh, while in general much simpler to return to a similar state, are also subject to the economic constraints of reprocessing in which they tend to be mixed up into various combinations from the collection process, but carbon steels can and are returned to forms that are essentially indistinguishable for practical purposes of functional strength, etc.
I would attribute any differences in quality of an end product not to reprocessing per se, but to a lessening of product specifications in response to target market niche. So, while there may be some truth in the original claim (which I don't know, but tend to doubt as stated), the net effect isn't so much owing directly to recycling but a combination of decisions of which recycled materials are at best only a part.
How's that for obfuscation? :)
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Not the case with plastic. Recycling causes degradation.

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I've just had my 2nd Craftsman router fail. A year ago I had three routers: my fathers Craftsman that must be 30+ years old, and two newer craftsman models. Care to guess which of the three is still running?
Oh well, now I get to start shopping for a good router...
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Mike wrote:

What is the failure mode? My cheapie Craftsman stopped running one day about 4 years ago, and I was able to fix it by removing the top cover and reattaching the wire that had come loose. That was before I replaced it with the Craftsman/Bosch that I use now. I still have the old one, and it still works--I just don't use it any more.
--Steve
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The first one just stopped working. I took it apart and tried to isolate a bad connection or switch but couldn't locate the problem - then as I dug further into the router, I opened part of the case that held all of the springs and such for the plunge mechanisim. BOING!! Little parts everywhere. Humpty Dumpty.
The most recent one has a shaft lock slider that seems to cut the power when depressed. Something in that electrical cutoff is bad because it will only run if I press up on the slider - which makes it kind of difficult to concentrate on the work at hand. I will try to fix this one, but I'm still going to start looking for a decent quality router setup - it is just so frustrating to have to stop working and fiddle around with crappy equipment.
Mike
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keith_nuttle wrote:

I always chuckle when I see people engaging in tool brand wars. Good work comes from good craftsmen. I rather imagine that Isaac Stern could have made an $80 violin sound better than I could do with a Stradivarius - quite a bit better :) I learned this lesson working on the electronics on the fishing fleet in Alaska as a kid. Parts were hard to get and advanced diagnostic tools were almost entirely absent or impossible to use. Try dragging a 40 lbs test rig up the ice encrusted side of an 80 foot mast and you get real good at doing major work with minimal tools. It was a lesson well learned. My consistent experience in every discipline I've ever attempted has been that, the better you get at something, the less critical the variety and kind of tools you use becomes. There are exceptions - never try to properly torque a bolt with a pair of pliers - but in the main, this rule has worked for me.
Craftsman power tools are not the finest built, but sometimes it's all you have or can afford, and I've seen some fine work done with them. Besides, you can often "mod" them to make things work your way. I have this Craftsman table saw ....
http://www.tundraware.com/Woodworking/TableSaw /
It isn't a Delta or Grizzly cabinet saw, but I managed to crank out one or two things with it that made me, at least, happy:
http://www.tundraware.com/Woodworking/ComputerTable / http://www.tundraware.com/Woodworking/JewelryBox / http://www.tundraware.com/Woodworking/WineRack / http://www.tundraware.com/Woodworking/Pipes/PipeRack2 /
Given the time, space, and money, I'd no doubt opt for a different saw. But as I have these three commodities in very limited supply, my "Crapsman" will just have to do.
Here's to another 38 years of happy WWing to you and your router...
P.S. Wanna bet that Van Gogh never had endless debates with his peers about what brushes he was using?
--
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Tim Daneliuk snipped-for-privacy@tundraware.com
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I always scratch my head a wonder what turnip truck they fell off of.
You are also right on great craftsmen, my great, great grand dad (civil war vet) who turned out beautiful walnut furniture complete with hand cut dove tails would have been tickled to death if he had, had a 10" Craftsman table saw or $99 Harbor Freight special to work with. RM~
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