Craftsman Radial Arm Saw Motor Removal

Page 1 of 2  
I have a Sears Model Number 113.197150 radial arm saw that is late eighties/early nineties vintage. The blade jammed into a piece of wood and now the motor hums, but does not spin when I turn it on. I have replaced the capacitor, but no luck. I wanted to take the motor off and have an electric motor shop take a look at it, but I can't figure out how to disconnect the power cord from the arm. Do I need to take the arm apart to get to the wire connections or do I try to take the motor apart? I can't figure out how to take the arm apart to get to the wires.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 03 Feb 2010 11:49:06 -0800, mikenj wrote:

Have you tried going to the Sears website and see if they have a manual for this saw? If they do, it may show you how to take the motor off. I'm never owned one of these, so don't know how you would do it.
Paul T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/3/10 1:49 PM, mikenj wrote:

I think there is a cable junction under the arm cover.
These diagrams should be a help in figuring out how to take it apart.
<http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/getModel !retrieve.pd?modelNumber3.197150>
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Does the motor shaft spin freely by hand? Will it start with a little push?
More than likely you will need to take the wires out of the motor.
Allen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did find the diagrams on the Sears website. No luck in showing how to take the arm apart to get to the wires. I also did try to spin the blade while starting with no luck. Allen says that I may have to take the wires out from the motor side, but it's not obvious how to take it apart. I think the arm would be a safer bet, but haven't found the magic entry point to take it apart.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/3/10 5:08 PM, mikenj wrote:

Are my posts not showing up?
<http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/getModel !retrieve.pd?modelNumber3.197150>
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"-MIKE-" wrote

<http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/getModel !retrieve.pd?modelNumber3.197150>
them out. Very nice if you want to tear into something and fix it.
But of course, there are some of us, who find this sort of thing to be outside their comfort zone. Personally, myself, I can do it. But I don't like to. And I make mistakes at this sort of thing. And have had parts left over after final assembly.
I can design things. I can build things. Not so good at fixing things.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/3/10 7:03 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

I guess I forget how it is for *normal* people. I was always opening up things as a kid... got my share of jolts from a charged capacitor or two. :-) And for 11 years, part of my job was tearing into electronics.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You will then have to disassemble the arm. It looks as though that you could take the cover off the arm. Look at the diagrams some more. From what I can tell, it looks like 6-9 screws to get the cover off. It looks like you will have to take the switch on the front of the arm apart as well.
Allen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, I see the zoomed diagram. I'll take a closer look and figure out how to open the arm up and get to the wiring. I'll let you all know how I make out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the motor has accessible carbon commutator brushes, I would remove them, check for damaged brush ends, check motor rotation without them and reinstall or replace them, before disassembling the entire arm.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The kind of motor that has brushes doesn't need or have a capacitor; the capacitor usually works with a 'start switch' which can be kept open by a speck of sawdust. Cleaning that switch is the goal of disassembly, and commonly one must remove one of the ends (bell housing) of the motor to get to it. It'll the the end housing that has the electrical wiring connections.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

.
You are correct that this motor has a capacitor and from my limited experience, was the only easy component that I can access within the motor. Also in this compartment are the 110/220v terminals. I did not see any switch inside the motor, unless you mean the start switch located in the arm. I have not opened that up yet, but have studied the diagram and will give it a try this weekend. As far as the motor, there is not much exposed as far as winding and brushes - it is a very sefl-contained unit except for the access to the capacitor. There are some hefty star screws with ominous warnings of removal which can cause misalignment. In any case, I do not have the drivers to unscrew them. I can do the basic stuff like disassemble and clean, but if the motor needs work, I will take it to a motor shop; otherwise it's $160 for a new motor - not very attractive.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mikenj wrote: ...

No, the centriugal switch that switches the start cap out of the circuit at speed.
If it ain't even hummin', that's not it. But, if it is a contacts problem, try taking the air hose and nozzle and blowing the housing out good.
I looked at the exploded drawing somebody showed link to a little -- they're not great for the specific purpose but it appears the leads to the switch are the simplest to get to likely as looks like motor-end connections are in the housing as opposed to a junction box.
There's bound to be a way in, simply start looking at the covers carefully, it's possible there's a snap-on cover over arm assembly.
The old small DeWalt I have has a set of screws on the front end of the switch cover that is a starting point, after that there's a cover on the top of the arm that is dust protection and cosmetics for the innards of the arm from the top. I forget otomh whether it just snaps on or is held by the side pieces that have the scale imprinted on them.
Overall, it can't be too complicated, just takes some detective work to see what went together last, hence comes apart first.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a .199350 version of the saw. Several years ago I replaced the electric cord with a longer one. As I recall, I took off the end plates of the arm and the cover then slips off. You can reach the terminals under the cover. (if that's what you're looking for)
Max
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/4/10 7:34 PM, Max wrote:

Nope, it's different. Yours is like mine, but not the same as his.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

On mine, the front plate on the arm is removed and the motor assembly rolled forward and off the arm. The Electrical cable was held by a small clamp screwed to the rear of the arm. When I removed the screw that held the clamp/cable in place, the entire motor assembly was ready to take to the "motor shop."
If you look closely on that motor, you may spy a small red button somewhere on the motor itself. This is a RESET BUTTON. If the blade turns freely (with the power off, pleas!) try pressing this little red button. Then plug it back in and turn on the power switch'
If this works, send my check to The Salvation Army in a rasonable amount.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, no check for you. I hit the reset more times than I can count. I followed the exact procedures in the troubleshooting guide with no luck. I did figure out how to get the front faceplate off and that is where the power cord terminates to the switch. Now I have a frozen screw that is not allowing me to get to the switch assembly. I sprayed it with some WD-40 and am letting it soak overnight. I'm guessing that there is something wrong with that reset switch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was successful in taking the front arm switch assembly apart and that is where the motor power cord terminates so it was three easy connections to take apart and I have freed the motor power cord from the switch. The trick is to figure out how to disassemble the grommet from the side of the arm where the motor power cord enters without destroying it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/6/10 11:37 AM, mikenj wrote:

Is it this kind? <
http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com/media/2006/02/stress-relief.JPG
<
http://store.marshamps.com/images/Strain%20relief.jpg
If so, you just have to pinch and pull. The cord can take it. Slip lock pliers with good knurling should do the trick.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.