Craftsman a Bosch Router?

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I am in the market for a plunge/fixed router and have been looking at the Bosch 1617EVSPK. Today I received a Sears flyer in the mail advertising their plunge/fixed router. After looking at the pictures and specifications the Sears appears to be the same router with their name on it. Is Bosch making this router for Sears? If so I am going to buy the Sears for it is on sale for a good price. The Sears model # is 1617-12
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If so I am going to buy the Sears for it is on

Buy Bosch for quality and durability
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wrote:

I recall there being a time that there were different colours of Bosch power tools. Similar in shape, but green and blue versions. I owned a green (cheaper) Bosch beltsander with bushings and a 'blue' Bosch beltsander with ball bearings. The green one lasted 5 years after the 'Blue' one died. Go figgur.
The Ridgid R2610 RO sander from The Borg is in fact a German made Metabo sander and one of the best sanders I have ever bought. I like it almost as much as my Festool Rotex sander..*G*
Routers and sanders are my life>>> I build solid surface countertops. That stuff is awful hard on tools.
2 cents
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wrote:

You're probably the 5th or 6th person I've heard say really good things about that sander. I gotta check it out.
Barry
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It is obviously made by Bosch, but that does not make it a Bosch product. I noticed that they have a clear baseplate, where Bosch has an opaque one. Sure, that might be an improvement, but they might have produced to greater tolerances, substituted plastic for metal, or who knows what.
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toller wrote:

I've often wondered what companies such as Bosch, Delta, etc. do with the parts that test out of spec and are not used in their own brand products???
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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RE: Subject
Only one of them is a tool builder.
IMHO, you can't even mention them in the same breath.
Lew
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wrote:

They don't make them. You can't afford to these days - companies that still operate by making rubbish and "testing out" the non-compliant stuff went bust some years ago. Modern manufacturing uses techniques like SPC so that you simply don't make the bad part in the first place.
There's still waste in a production process, but this is far smaller than it was twenty years ago and the stream of "out of gauge" components being rejected at a late inspection stage has almost vanished.
--
Smert' spamionam

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So the Harbor Freight stuff is made that way on purpose?
--
Hank Gillette

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On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 10:47:57 -0500, Hank Gillette

Bronze bushings vs roller bearings. Hardening? What's that? Nylon gears (or worse stamped gears) instead of machined gears. Fewer armature plates and windings - can save lots of money here - brushes wear out quicker and the motor is not as smooth running but what the heck.
Lots of ways to make it cheaper. The really tough thing is to make it better.
We all vote with our buck (pound for Andy) and, in the end, the companies that survive will be those who get our vote. The question is - do you want to have good quality tools in the future? If so you had better start voting for them now.
TWS
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On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 10:47:57 -0500, Hank Gillette

Yes. Extremely high _production_ quality of a very poor specification. You should see the factory - it's probably gorgeous.
Modern "rubbish tools" are some of the best-made engineering ever produced. If they were made to the machining standards of a WW2 Rolls-Royce Merlin, they'd simply fall apart. There was a time when things were well designed, cost was ignored, and hand-fitting to assemble them was accepted (just look at the process for fitting the reduction gears on a Merlin - the shaft was torqued to simulate load, and only then were the bolt holes reamed by hand). These days they have to emerge from the machine and practically fall together themselves - no time for careful assembly or fitting.
So if that shaft is loose, it's not loose because it's mis-drilled, it's sloppy because someone timed how long it took to assemble it when it fitted correctly, and shaved 5 seconds off the assembler's time by making it a slack fit instead.
Chrome plate used to be thick because the thickness couldn't be controlled on corners and the easiest solution was to over-plate to compensate. Now a shaped anode can control the thickness on edges and corners to be adequate, so the rest of it can be thinned out.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Nova wrote:

if Oshawa. The batteries were tested and if they passed they were kept as Delco batteries but if they failed they were sold to various other companies to market as their own. How badly it failed determined which company would buy it. According to him Canadian Tire took the lowest grade. I can believe it the last one I bought from them lasted 6 months and shorted internally, of course I was no where near a CTC store and went to a GM dealer and bought a Delco - it lasted 6 years.
Rick
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wrote:

Cheaper models are designed to be cheaper: it would cost more money to do it on a parts selection basis.
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Russ wrote:

Not to say that the Sears isn't a good tool, but you can't tell if it's the same from the outside. They can change the internals - use plastic gears instead of metal, smaller bearings, etc - without you knowing from the external appearance. SWMBO bought a famous maker mixer for a 'good' price from the BORG and it broke two days later. Seems that the ones that the borg carries have plastic gears to keep the cost down. SAME MODEL NUMBER as the ones you buy from kitchen specialty stores which cost more. Difference is inside. This was confirmed by a call to the mfg. Needless to say, she took it back for a refund and paid the few extra bucks for the real deal.
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I just bought an 18V Cordless Skil Brand Drill. When I looked at the manufacturers plate. It's made by the Robert Bosch Tool Corporation. Look up the name in a search engine and it will take you to the Bosch Tool Website. At the top of the page, it's the Robert Bosch Tool Corp.
Is it an inferior product. That depends. Most large manufacturers make several grades of tools. A Bosch drill would use a metal clutch assembly, like a DeWalt. The Skil and hobbyist level tool would use a high impact plastic for the clutch assembly.
Do I need the reliability of a DeWalt. No. I'm not a contractor. But I'd have to kill three of these Skil Drills to spend the same money as I would have for one DeWalt.
To put it simply. I'd take a look at the unit itself, and see if there are any manufacturers information on the unit. If it's the Robert Bosch Tool Corpororation or some other big name, I would lean towards having more confidence of it being a reasonable quality product, versus some no name company.
Pat
wrote:

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Bosh OWNS Skil. This does not mean that Skil tools are made in the same plant, or even the same country, as Bosch tools. Nor does it mean that the tools are manufactured to the same specs, or that they have to meet the same levels of quality.
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I agree 100%. But I'm a lot more comfortable buying a tool if it has some attachment to a certain manufacturer than a 100% no name from the far east, that will start smoking the first time you use it.
On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 01:23:23 GMT, Lobby Dosser

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The first 1617EVS Bosch router that I bought in August of 1998, the same one that we are talking about here had to be returned because within 5 minutes of use the on/off switch failed. The dealer exchanged it for another new one. Again after the first use I was unable to get the bit out of the self extracting collet. I totally screwed collet and bit off the router as one unit and returned again to the dealer. We finally managed to get the bit out of the collet and had to try 2 more new collets before we found one that would not lock on to the bit. This was not a case of a bad one out of many, it was a case of poor quality control.
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It wasn't a metric collet? I have no problems whatsoever with fixed bits. And I have three collets.
--
mare

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message wrote:

1/2"
The edges had to be smoothed up so that the collet inside the nut would move. The collet is suppose to be some what loose and none of these were.
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