Cracked plane

I have a Miller's Falls No. 900B bench plane with two very small hairline cracks near the throat on the bottom. They are on opposite sides (left and right) and are opposing (front and rear).
I got it at a flea market for about $10 or so and have used it as a "curio" item on my bookshelf. Thinking about using it and wondering if I should get them spot welded before use, or just use until it breaks clean and then either weld them or again return as a "curio" item.
Any thoughts?
MJ Wallace
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thu, Feb 1, 2007, 6:32pm (EST-3) From: snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com doth queryeth:: <snip> Thinking about using it and wondering if I should get them spot welded before use, or just use until it breaks clean and then either weld them or again return as a "curio" item. Any thoughts?
Yeeh. Why even ask? t's your plane, do whatever you want to with it.
However, on the off chance you're wanting to know what I would do with a plane in that conditiom, then I have to say that I don't know - because I don't have a plane like that. You could give it to me, then we could both find out.
JOAT Only those who have the patience to do simple things perfectly will acquire the skill to do difficult things easily. - Johann Von Schiller
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brazing of cast iron is within the grasp of a reasonably capable home craftsman. I'd use your best judgment as to whether the plane is in danger of breaking further. if it is, I think I'd take a try at brazing it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I suppose I'd take a look and see if the cracks are not a result of poor use or drop damage, rendering the plane unusable as such. If it won't fettle easily, bookend it is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have had good luck with epoxy repairs and reflattening using an abrasive belt on the tablesaw.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My first plane was a Stanley #3 that I bought at a garage sale. It had been broken completely in half and repaired with heavy brazing. It is still one of my favorite planes, albeit with little collector value.
I say fix that puppy!
I'll also second epoxy as a fix. I've used a product called Marine- Tex for motorcycle repairs and it has worked great for years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

As others have noted, cast iron can be brazed and planes that have been repaired well are quite useable. If I understand the Millers Falls numbering system a '900' plane is 9 inches long. If the front breaks off entirely what is left might be useful as a bull-nose or chisel plane...
--
FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It is possible to braze, silver-braze, or nickel-braze cast iron with good results, BUT you have to get the entire plane up to heat as you do it (or the cast iron is likely to crack). Silver-braze is best for penetrating a small crack, nickel-braze is best for strength or making a fillet.
I did it once, with nickel rod and oxyacetylene, and the results were good. If I had to do it at home, a bed of charcoal will keep the plane body at working temperature, but you still want oxyacetylene to melt the nickel (actually nickel-copper) fill rod.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.