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Let me know if you get any tearout at the end of the "cut". <G>
Max
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Max wrote:

I won't get tearout because I'll have something clamped there to keep that from happening! :)
Has anyone noticed any good deals on bits at The Woodworking Shows that I should be on the lookout for? I think I'd like to get a small set of "round-over" bits. I am obviously not running a production shop, but I'd rather not buy cheap bits, or ones from Fiddler on a Roof if you know what I mean ("If I were a rich man..."). Which ones would you be buying (do you have a set in mind)? I think I better start investigating my choices before I go!
It may seem that I approach ww at a snail's pace sometimes, but at least it doesn't all show up on the same credit card statement! --I'm not sure I can afford to work alot faster. :-) I may start keeping a project/idea notebook (an idea that was suggested in the "Design" thread) to help me keep track of my project ideas. Think spring!
Bill

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wrote:

Just shop - don't sweat the pay to get in, pay to get out shows...you can usually do better on-line and miss the hype.
I suggest just buying bits as you need them - otherwise you'll end up with a bunch of bits you don't use. Or buy a set of "cheap bits" and see which ones wear out and replace those with better ones.
IMHO far too much money/effort is often spent on complex router bits to accomplish in one pass what can be done in 2-3 passes with simple bits in combination, on projects where 2-3 passes is not that big of a deal in the overall time, and time isn't money, but bits are.
While the true believers will wail that the angles are all wrong, for straight spiral bits, I veer into the metalworking suppliers to save up to 80% off (that does take a good sale) WW suppliers for what certainly appear to be the same bits (end mills, in metalworking parlance), and the angles work just fine for me. Pay attention to shank size ;-)
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

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Ecnerwal wrote:

I enjoyed your post. I spent the last 2 hours or so comparing roundover/beading bits. Naturally, I ended up looking at Freud's 6 pc set for $109. Of course, just the 1/2"R bit is about $35, I think, and the set comes with the even more expensive 3/4"R bit.
As you suggested, I should probably just buy the 1/2"R bit I want now, even though I know I'll need some smaller ones in the future. Woodcraft has the set of bits I mentioned above. Now if they publish a WW Show coupon like Rockler did, for this weekend, then I'll be in business! At 25% off, I think I'd take the bait! : )
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Yep, Rockler's 3/8"R roundover bit, for $30.99, less 25% off of that this weekend. That keeps me in my "comfort zone"--and is still a little high for one bit...lol. When I took a second look, I noticed Freud's 6 pc set only includes 5 bits--they counted a bearing as a pc. So it wasn't as great of a deal as I thought at first.
Bill
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MLCS recently had an email sale on 1/2" shank round-over, cove, and straight bits. IIRC they were two sets of four each (take your pick) for $30. I don't know how good these bits are but I figured what the heck. I've found other MLCS bits to be at least passable. The various e-tailers often have some pretty good specials for their spam victims. ;-)
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Was looking at some end mills just the other day for their intended use and a light bulb lit up that they looked just like spiral router bits. Do you have a particular vendor you recommend?
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On 1/21/2011 2:11 AM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

I use end mills exclusively in my Multi-Router. I've found Travers Tool Co to have a large selection and the best service:
http://www.travers.com/subcat.asp?navPath=All+Products%2F%2F%2F%2FCutting%3A+H.S.S.+%26+Solid+Carbide%2F%2F%2F%2FEnd+Mills
Lots to choose from, so unless you know exactly what you want prepare to spend some time researching.
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http://www.travers.com/subcat.asp?navPath=All+Products%2F%2F%2F%2FCutting%3A+H.S.S.+%26+Solid+Carbide%2F%2F%2F%2FEnd+Mills
Thanks!
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MSC, Enco, McMaster-Carr - Enco, particularly, has lots of sales/free shipping deals (and is apparently owned by MSC for some time now.) Import .vs. Made in USA is clearly called out (and once in a while is actually India, rather than that other place) so no problem/mystery choosing domestic production, even though they certainly have lots of import stuff. Enco has a bit less selection than the other two.
There are many others, those happen to be the big three, and get stuff to you in reasonable time, if not always the rock-bottomest of price for everything - shop around before committing - but often they are the only places you can find that have certain items (now, things like a Sawzall, you'll laugh at MSC's prices for, but those are easy to get elsewhere.)
I'll certainly go have a look at Travers now that Swingman has mentioned it - was not on my radar previously. Comparing an item I use, Enco hot deals catalog for the month has Atrax USA long 1/2 solid carbide end mills for about $8 less than Traver's TTC offering (and $70 less than the MA Ford version) for the 2" flute length, and has a 3" flute length version if you need it (be careful about CNC Router programming errors or you'll snap that sucker) which I don't see at Travers. Can't say that I've actually compared all three brands in use. Regular prices are about the same, but the sales are recurrent at Enco.
--
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wrote:

Good advice. I'll check out Enco. Thanks!
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On 1/21/2011 8:44 AM, Ecnerwal wrote:

Likewise, wasn't even aware of Enco ... thanks for the headsup.
I realize that Travers is not cheap, but I usually don't mind paying extra for service and quality, both of which are in abundance at Travers, IME.
But, if I can both of those somewhere else less expensively ....
Thanks.
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I got a set of 50 bits for $40 (on sale) at a local shop. They may be lousy bits, but it does give me a wide selection in a nice box. When (or if) I wear out or damage a bit from the set, I can replace it with a better one.
--
Peter Bennett, VE7CEI
peterbb4 (at) interchange.ubc.ca
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Pshaw!! The ad shows a 1 'foot' cutter height. No wonder they advise a router table. <G>
Max
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Bill wrote:

I used some 2x4s. Four pieces, IIRC...2 attached to the base, 2 hinged to those with wheels so I can move it where I want it. A couple of wooden (ply) cams raise it onto the wheels and set it back down so it won't roll. Works fine
--

dadiOH
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Bummer.
OMG, an $830 drill press? Whatcha gonna make with it?

If the plywood will be on the concrete floor, why wouldn't any old formaldehyde-free (FF) plywood work? If you just want to space it off the floor, why not slap some FF plywood over wunbasixes or tubatwelves to hold 'em together?

What is the plywood for, specifically? It it's to help keep the DP on its foot, the bigger the better.

First, the picture of the new lighting array, all set up and glowing. ;)
-- You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

For starters, I'm going to drill the mortises on my new work benches (I posted pictures of them in a SU drawing on my web site a while back). It may also be nice for drilling a banjo neck where the hoop attaches. Oh, and "suet logs" for my wife's birds. I may try to go into business making those..if I can get the price they get for them at "Bird's Unlimited"
By the way, I did not justify paying $830 for a drill press. I just sort of lucked my way into one at a much reduced price. No, less.

Yep, I'm looking forward to seeing something like that too! Thanks for your help and your interest!
Bill
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On 1/3/2011 8:39 AM, Bill wrote:

In many parts of the country Home Depots' hardwood plywood, "PureBond" brand, is manufactured by Columbia Forest Products which uses formaldehyde free glue in their process, and _is_ LEEDS EQ 4.4 compliant:
http://www.columbiaforestproducts.com/FAQ.aspx
As in all things having to do with marketing these days, the word "free" may not mean to you what it means to a sleazy marketeer, so YMMV. Still worth checking out.
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Swingman wrote:

In their brochure, Columbia Forest Products describes their "PureBond" products as being suitable for "furniture, cabinets, and fixtures". As they omitted "flooring", I'm inferring that it may not be up to the task of serving as a baseboard for my DP. I have a Home Depot nearby and am hoping to be able to use their PureBond materials in my projects. Thank you for your suggestion.
Bill
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Are you going to be inspected by OSHA or something? If not then don't worry about any specific grade. The "formaldehyde-free" stuff that Home Depot sells is all hardwood and it's a pretty decent grade. It should do fine. If you don't trust it glue two thicknesses of it together so that you've got an inch and a half--that should hold anything that you're able to carry into your shop without a forklift.

Basically you want to keep it from tipping over. Use a layer of 3/4 inch ply of any decent grade with a 2x3 frame under it and you've overkilled the problem.

If you don't work with big pieces you can probably get away with no baseboard. However having gotten used to getting away with it one day you'll forget yourself and use it to drill something big enough to tip it over. And the top of a drill press is a really big hammer.
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