CPOworkshop.com Experience

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I wrote:

"Lobby Dosser" asks:

A debit card transfers all the normal charge card functions and protections from the bank to the debit card holder.
A debit card holder pays first, not last like a charge card.
The bank uses your money, not the other way around.
A debit card holder does the bank's work that is included with a charge card in the event of a dispute..
Unlike divorce , the screwing you get for the screwing you got, a debit card is the screwing you get for the screwing you didn't get.
There is more, but you get the idea.
The only thing a debit card does is provide fiscal discipline for those who don't have it.
Lew
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It's as good as cash, and therefore a bargaining chip with small vendors who don't want to screw with CC charges and effort.
--
If your name is No, I voted for you - more than once ...


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Swingman wrote:
> An "in-stock" item on their website, put on backorder and my card > charged in the interim. > > Raised hell with both CPO (I refused to cancel the order and let them > off the hook) and my credit card company and ended up getting the part > much sooner than I would have according to their original email ... > coincidental? I think not. > > This is an apparent "business practice" that they indulge in when it is > convenient to them and I personally will not allow them to indulge by > tying up my $$/credit, period.
<old message>: Swingman, Inspired by your comments, I just sent an email message to the corporate level (Delta/Porter-Cable) regarding their "Authorized Delta Online Retailer". One might infer CPO is violating their policy of "7-day delivery for in stock merchandise". Perhaps that will motivate them to ship my DP a little faster..
Bill -------------------------
Well, in case anyone is curious, here is the final update/history:
First week of November, Ordered Delta 17-959L DP. Item was listed as in stock for next day delivery. Was informed 5 days later that order was expected to ship in late January.
2 weeks later, I emailed CPO to ask if they were going to temporarily refund my CC due to the long time frame, but I did not receive a reply.
I contacted Porter-Cable describing the details of this matter with regard to policies associated with being a "Authorized Delta Online Retailer". After another 2 weeks, I suspect they had not received a reply from them (either), so, perhaps motivated in part by my email messages, they elevated my concern to having their sales-rep investigate.
A few days after that, I got a phone call from CPO, out of the blue, offering to upgrade my order to the Delta 18-900L at no additional cost (which I thought was really cool!). They said that they thought there was one at the factory ready to ship the next day or so.
About 3 weeks later (today), a very long 18-wheeler showed up at the end of my steet and I happily toted my new DP 250 feet to its new home on my dolly. :) This purchasing experience was a little frustrating, but the numbers worked out pretty well for me in the end. I want to say "Thanks CPO(for the free upgrade)! I appreciate that CPO always answered their phone even it they usually didn't have the details I was looking for.
The carton arrived in excellent condition, so the DP appears to have had a nice uneventful 500 mile trip. My inclination is to wait until after I finish my painting and lighting upgrade, before assembling it. Maybe I'll just peek inside the box to make sure there are no broken plastic parts, or the like. This surely will be smarter than assembling it now, right? I'm not sure I'll be able to get through the whole day without that "peek"! :)
Bill
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Bill wrote:

i would have looked inside whilst the truck was still there. i had a compressor delivered that was pre-broken, even though the outside gave no indication of that. i refused delivery and a new undamaged one came about 3 weeks later.
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On 12/29/2010 5:11 PM, chaniarts wrote:

You just guaranteed that will happen shortly ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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Swingman wrote:

I unpacked the table and other loose parts from the carton. All of the parts appear to be in excellent condition (sigh) and are suitably heavy. I just read the manual. I'm sure my assembly time will far exceed the 30-60 minutes Delta provided as an estimate. It will take me that long to fit a plywood baseboard to the base, not including a trip to the store to get the necessary carriage bolts. I expect that either a Forstner bit or a Brad point drill bit is called for to properly countersink the holes on the bottom of the plywood, is that correct (I currently lack both)?
As far as "seating the chuck (and taper spindle)"--does it just require a gentle tap with a twobyfour and a hammer, or something more? I realize it would be quite dangerous if these parts broke loose. The owner's manual was vague regarding this (I know I can DAGS, I'm just sharing my concerns...). That seems like the most tenuous connection in the whole machine.
Hopefully, some of the assembly steps will go fast as there are quite a few of them--not including adjusting the laser (LOL). I think I won't rush. I'm not sure if I'll need assistance or not. I have some carpeting I plan to lay on the concrete first. And if I can install the head there (horizontally), I may be able to complete the job myself... Should be interesting. Once I get that plywood baseboard to fit properly I should have enough confidence to sail through the rest of the assembly (yes, that is sarcasm...)! One step at a time...truly amazing (to me) how that seems to simplify the overwhelming...
Maybe I'll be able to drill some "suet logs" for my wife's birds in a few days...that's something to shoot for. : ) Thanks for your interest.
Bill
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http://www.jacobschuck.com/drill-chuck-install.asp
--
Stuart Winsor

Midland RISC OS show - Sat July 9th 2011
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Bill wrote:

1. Clean the spindle.
2. Insert spindle & chuck
3. Crank down onto piece of wood on table with moderate force _____________

Dangerous? All that would happen is that they would drop out.
BTW, don't try to use auger bits with it, they will pull out the spindle.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Yes, but I find the thought of them dropping out at 2000 RPM to be unsettling! :) Thank you, and Stuart, for your tips!
The weather is cooperating (50F), which is really nice because the snow has melted and there is lots more room to cut plywood outside(on saw horses). I'll try for perfect cuts with a homemade "fence" and a circular saw. I think I'm sort of getting to be a more knowledgeable newbe--this project should help me assess how I'm doing! If I can't cut a nice rectangle with 4 holes in the right place, maybe I should give up now (j/k)! :) I'm not going to settle for anything I couldn't show to Lew!
Bill
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I've learned a great lot about plywood lately. I've shared here in the past that I have allergy issues with formaldehyde.
I'm having a rather impossible time finding a "formaldehyde free" or e-0 emissions piece of plywood that is suitable for having my new 280 pound DP (Delta 18-900L) resting on it continuously. It seems this application calls for a quality suitable for industrial flooring (as opposed to a residential counter top).
When I talked to the person at Rockler this morning, he acted as if he didn't even know of anyone who used a plywood "base board" on his/her DP. So I wonder if I'm making a mountain out of a mole hill here.
Maybe since this detail is a major inconvenience, maybe I don't need a 24"x29" baseboard (the base of the DP is 18"x23") as much as is suggested by the manual.
Please advise, if you would be so kind.
Bill
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anything, the suggestion for the base board size is too small.
As some one who has done extensive drill press work, both in metal and wood, I can assure that some type of base extension for the drill press is both necessary and prudent. Drill presses, by their construction, are top heavy. It takes very little to tip one over. And when they go over, they often are damaged beyond repair. They also have the potential to cause somebody some real injury.
For folks who do serious work, they often have more substantial platforms than just plywood. I have seen big slabs of metal and plywood and 2 X 4 bases. I have also seen a drill press secured to the wall..
If you are drill long stock that is clamped to the table, you have a big lever than can tip the drill press over. Even if supported on the ends, sometimes something can happen to those supports.
You paid good money for this machine. You don't want anything to happen to it. You want to operate it in a safe fashion., It is prudent, safe and intelligent to make this machine stable.
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Lee Michaels wrote: ...

Lee, Your points are well taken. I DO intended to drill mortises on long boards (and the potential concerns were already going through my head. Your post provides the confirmation I needed to resolve this matter in an appropriate way.
Making a base board out of 2by4s, as dadiOH suggested, seems the most practical setup to me. The DP has 18" x 23" base, and a (minimum) 24" x 29" baseboard (3" overhang) was recommended in owner's manual.
Please consider the following design: 30" by 33" (6" overhang), 3 1/2" high.
Formed by twenty 33" 2by4s bound together only with 4 or 5 half-inch diameter 29.5" threaded steel rods (using countersunk bolts).
This is hardly cast in stone. I appreciate the feedback I get from you folks who know what you are doing!
Glue necessary? Shrinkage concerns? Additional threaded rods? The manual suggested attached DP base to baseboard with M8x 1.25 x125mm carriage bolts. Obviously, the baseboard above will require much longer bolts. Realizing that the 4 bolts holding the DP to the baseboard are an important factor, will the extra width introduce a new new safety concern?
dadiOh's baseboard has wheels...I have to think more about how that would work. I'm not planning to move the DP far, but being able to move it around easily would definitely be nice!
Bill
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the drill press on. Just layout a big rectangle with the 2 X stock laying flat. Then take a circular saw and cut some lap joints. Use some construction adhesive and screws or nails. Make up a big platform that is an inch and a half thick. If you need to cover it, just use some low cost pine. That way you don't have to use the chemical laden plywood. Remember, it is just a platform to mount your tool on. It is not some piece of furniture. I have seen and built a basic little stand underneath the drill press on the platform. You can store a few things there, drills, etc.
I have built a number of these platforms and like the ones that are big enough to stand on. Your bodyweight just adds to the stability of the machine while you are working.
I would also use a stronger bolt than a carriage bolt. Most carriage bolts these days are cheap junk. Get something that is hardened and countersink the heads.

cement, you can drag it to where you want. If you have to move it far, use wheels. I worry about wheels on something like this. Drill presses are top heavy and it is easy for it to get away from you when you are tipping it. I don't want to add wheels to that equation.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

I like the design alot! Thank you for explaining it.
Bill

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Lee Michaels wrote:

Hmmm..the way I was thinking of this design the first time I read it was to span 2by4 "ribs" across the inside of the frame (in fact, essentially "filling" the frame). Of course, they would be held by nails or screws into end grain. This might not be an issue because they are basically being supported by the concrete. Or perhaps even better, I could nail them to the frame from above at a 45 degree angle. If I omit the ribs then the pine seems sure to bow a great deal raising vanity and safety concerns. Then I was going to nail 3/4" pine over the frame/ribs.
I've been thinking about cutting those overlapping joints. I just measured that my circular saw can cut 2 1/2 inches deep. I will make the cut on the end with appropriate fear and trepidation. I may even buy an extra piece of wood, just in case, based upon my previous experience with this circular saw...
One problem will be that the end of a 2by4 is too short to give me a "line of sight". Hmmm...maybe I can clamp a fixture(straight iron) to the edge of the board to guide the saw. Woodworking 101 stuff, huh?
Bill

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Bill wrote:

Since you liked my 2x4 base idea, I got up from my sick bed, walked out to my shop and looked to see exactly what I had done.
I didn't use 2x4s. What I did...
1. Two pieces of appropriately sized 3/4 ply fastened together.
2. Caster in each corner.
3. There are two pieces of 2x4 hinged on edge to the underside of the ply. When they *are* on edge, the casters are not touching the floor; when the pieces are in the "up" (not on edge) position, they are held that way by a couple of cabinet catches; they are moved from up to down by two 3/4" plywood handles attached to the 2x4s. The purpose of all this was to provide stability whenever I needed to exert great lateral force with the machine. That has never happened. IOW, a waste of time.
4. The DP is bolted to the ply base. ______________
Regarding your plan, there is nothing wrong with it and I'm reasonably sure it would outlast the pyramids but I think it may be a tad more than is really needed.
Regardless of what you wind up doing, I don't think you want a solid flat base sitting on the floor...floors aren't necessarily flat...wood chips get on the floor...wood chips keep stuff from sitting flat. Et cetera.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Aww.. don't do that again. Your post was interesting to read though. Guided by Lee Michael's post, I've sort of formed the opinion that having wheels on a top heavy DP is sort of dangerous. No one would be there to assist me if I were to tip it a bit too far...
You made a good point about not having a flat base on the floor. Hopefully a rectangular frame contacting as much of the floor as possible will be okay--I can always shim it.
Bill

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Bill wrote:

Why would you tip it? Pull and it rolls. Alternatively, push and it rolls. It doesn't even *THINK* of tipping thanks to my nice big plywood base :)
--

dadiOH
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It's only going to tip if the wheels are too close together. If you want to overkill a wheeled platform make it big enough that you stand on it when you work the drill press. I don't think that that is necessary, but some people like overkill.

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I think it is ironic that you use the word overkill when talking about safety.
For a dyed in the wool safety freak, there ain't no such thing.
Just saying...
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