Course hand saw for resawing

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That matches what I say.
On 6/7/2016 2:22 AM, whit3rd wrote:

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Martin, nobody in this thread has disputed that the shape of rip teeth and crosscut teeth are different.
What you are insisting, which is wrong, and which everyone has been trying to politely correct you, is that rip teeth have no set. That is simply wrong. Rip teeth have set. Hacksaw teeth have set. Pretty much every tooth on every saw has set(*).
(* the exceptions are when the tooth is wider than the blade, as is the case with most power saw blades; or things like felling saws where the raker teeth are not set).
John
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On 6/7/2016 9:42 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Another certain exception are some styles of jig saw blades. Many of the ones I use have no set and leave an almost burnished surface.
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Not very long lasting though and useless in anything over 25mm
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On 6/7/2016 1:53 PM, steve robinson wrote:

Regardless they are quite common and useful.
They last long enough, I have been using them for 15+ years. And FWIW jigsawing over an inch thick is pretty much using the wrong saw. I prefer quality of cut over longevity.
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look at a pull blade. The teeth are withing the width of the metal. The rip has a tiny set. A cross cut you have a tool that puts set and it is a strong set. You press the handle together and a tongue presses in to a slot of the anvil. This is a setting tool. Every other tooth, then rotate the saw and align and press the other teeth. The trick is to get the proper tooth in the proper bent position and all at the same amount or the job is jerky. Many saws are flopped down on a bench and the set starts to get out of align. If you don't sharpen and set your own tools you will never know.
The problem is set is set or set isn't set. One has to measure with a finer instrument to measure the set in a rip. The set is very tiny so it doesn't tear the side grain and keeps a cleaner cut.
The crosscut does that cuts back and forth ripping and tearing and shearing. It is fighting fiber strands on every tooth. The strands grip the sides of the blade. One wants a wide kerf for an easy cut.
We used to set saws before a job. We sawed many a sheet of plywood to make book cases long before fancy power tools came to the home owner.
Martin
On 6/7/2016 9:42 AM, John McCoy wrote:

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On Monday, May 30, 2016 at 3:04:21 PM UTC-7, Michael wrote:

You want a rip saw (or resharpen a saw to give it rip teeth). Me, I'd use a table saw, making two nearly half-through cuts with a narrow kerf blade, then finish the cut with a handsaw (it'll take some planing, too).
A rip saw (backless handsaw type) typically has 5 teeth/inch and no top bevel on the teeth. They're fast and easy for rip-to-width chores, but resawing makes a lot more sawdust per inch.
Pros use bandsaws with rip blades, of course.
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On 5/30/2016 6:04 PM, Michael wrote:

The current crop of saws are crosscut only. Get an old RIP saw. put a file on the teeth and go for it.
--
Jeff

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Set in the teeth makes it a crosscut. If you have a "saw set" a tool like a Pliers with a anvil and a press pin that bends a tooth to one side. Move and do every other one. Then rotate the saw and work down the other teeth pressing them off center like the others.
To convert - press the teeth back into line - e.g. press the wrong tooth to the center line working on both sides.
Martin
On 5/31/2016 10:09 AM, woodchucker wrote:

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On Wed, 1 Jun 2016 22:57:52 -0500, Martin Eastburn

Both crosscut and rip have set

How to ruin a saw , doing that can cause stress fractures in the base of the tooth, if you wish to convert a crosscut to a rip for small section timber you need to re cut the teeth set then sharpen
A converted saw is not really suitable for large scale ripping, the blades are not generally thick enough to cope.
Better to buy a rip saw

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The rip has more of a wave in the teeth and they are full width. Think of a hacksaw.
Crosscut are extreme bent and are sharp points.
Martin
On 6/2/2016 5:57 AM, steve robinson wrote:

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On 05/30/2016 5:04 PM, Michael wrote:

What size stock are you starting with? Tage Frid would also have used the frame saw, I'd give an advantage here to the Japanese "cut on pull" design as being where the bowing isn't such an issue as w/ push w/ Western saws...
--



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As everyone else has said, you need a ripsaw. Ripsaws are available at the likes of Home Depot or Lowes for a fairly low price; they are crap - the handles are so badly mis-shapen your hands will cry in agony after 5 minutes use (as a rule of thumb, if there's a straight line anywhere on handle, the saw is worthless - doubly so if it's also plastic).
There are a few serious saw makers who offer saws sharpened as ripsaws. They are not cheap.
The third alternative is to get an old saw from a flea market or antique store and sharpen it. In my (limited) experience, about 1 saw in 4 in "ye olde antique mall" is a rip saw, you'll want to familiarize yourself with what a rip profile looks like so you recognize the one you want. It is not difficult to sharpen ripsaw teeth (crosscut is more complex, altho still not difficult). You may find the available saws have had paint slobbered over them by hack artists, but it can be scraped off. A little rust is no problem, it will wear off in use and leave a nice patina.
John
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