Course hand saw for resawing

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I'm making some oak and cedar boxes with hand tools only, and I want to res aw 3/4 inch boards to 1/4. My current hand saw takes about a year and a hal f to get the job done, and I'm wondering if I'm better off buying a course cutting hand saw, maybe a 9 pt or so. Does anyone have any experience or ad vice for this project?
Thanks,
Mike
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On 5/30/2016 5:04 PM, Michael wrote:

Too young/small to operate it, but watched my grandfather use a frame saw to resaw. The old shop in England I worked in briefly had them, but being low on the totem pole I wasn't allowed to use.
Lot of effort regardless, but if I were forced to do it, I would investigate going that route. Probably big toothed, set to rip, and sharp as possible.
I recall seeing numerous plans in years past in magazines. Internet has to full of them.
I do know that making things by hand, with tools you also made, triples the satisfaction factor.
Good luck.
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"Michael" wrote in message

I'm sure others would have differing opinions, but here's my take on it:
For this type of work a rip saw is generally used and the tpi would generally be in the 4-5 range. You need rather large gullets to clear the swarf while resawing... If the stock is under saw 3" in width you could use a rip saw with 6-7 tpi but I wouldn't even try resawing with anything finer as the swarf would all but keep it from cutting. If you were ripping a board to width the higher tpi saws can give fine results but for rough work even there a 4-5 tpi saw would be preferred for speed.
Some examples include:
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pF886&cat=1,42884,63338 https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/panel-saws-panel-saw-rip-cut-
or perhaps a rip frame saw:
http://www.blackburntools.com/new-tools/new-saws-and-related/roubo-frame-saw-blade/index.html http://www.fine-tools.com/gestell.html
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On Monday, May 30, 2016 at 6:05:18 PM UTC-5, John Grossbohlin wrote:


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saw-blade/index.html

John and Swingman,
Thanks for the good direction! I've watched this video a couple of times an d I think I'll make the kerf plane and the frame saw and go from there. The kerf plane is apparently this guy's own invention. It appears to work grea t. I probably won't go for the man bun though.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtmswWZ4Lvo

Mike
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"Michael" wrote in message

Here's a video from my old haunt...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_cuVge6-o0

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The two types of long hand saws - Rip and crosscut. Almost everyone has a crosscut saw - it has teeth that are bent side to side.
Rip saws have teeth that are inline without any set. Wax the saw and let it rip!
The crosscut cuts a wider kerf as the fibers are facing the blade and will bind the saw if the kerf isn't wide enough.
Martin
On 5/30/2016 11:26 PM, Michael wrote:

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On Wed, 1 Jun 2016 22:48:39 -0500, Martin Eastburn

Rubbish, all saws have set on them otherwise they bind when cutting
The set should run between 1.2 and 1.6 of the blade on standard cross cut/ panel saws or rip saws although some timbers might require a set of 2.00 of the blade ( very rare )
You never set greater than this because the Centrex of the blade fails to make contact with the timber properly , makes the saws cutting action rough
You set the saw according to they type of timber and moisture content, hence old joiners may have several handsaws hanging in the shop
Generally speaking the drier the timber the less set is required.
If you need to wax up a saw on a regular basis to cut your saw is incorrectly set or your using the wrong saw.

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On Thu, 02 Jun 2016 11:52:05 +0100, steve robinson wrote:

Agreed. Although Disston did make a 120 crosscut that had no set but a tapered blade "for dry hardwoods only". But it hasn't been made for almost 100 years :-).
Also Martin, crosscut and rip saws are sharpened differently. Rip saw teeth are sharpened straight across and act like little chisels. Crosscut teeth are sharpened at an angle and act like little knives.
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On 06/02/2016 11:59 AM, Larry Blanchard wrote: ...

A pretty nice explanation/illustration page is at
<http://blackburntools.com/articles/saw-tooth-geometry/index.html
There are, of course, the specialty "no set on a side" dudes for things like trimming dowels flush and the like, but the general truth is indeed w/ "no set, no saw" 'cuz you'll never be able to push it after the first strokes get the barrel of the blade in the kerf with no clearance -- which of course, was the "trick" w/ the 120; the body was thinner than the teeth to provide, if you will, "reverse set".
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Thank you fer the link. Definitely clarifies what you folks have been talking about. ;)
nb
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On Thu, 02 Jun 2016 12:35:48 -0500, dpb wrote:

That's the best explanation I've ever seen - many thanks.
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Yes sharpened differently and set differently. Different saws. Martin
On 6/2/2016 11:59 AM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

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On Thu, 2 Jun 2016 21:02:44 -0500, Martin Eastburn

It wasnt very successful and most tradesmen of the day on re sharpening added a small amount of set.

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How old are you steve ? I've been using rip and crosscut since 1952. This is before all of the fancy power junk that splinter the wood.
I know what I'm talking about. Running along the grain is smooth cutting and you will splinter the board if you use a crosscut.
Martin
On 6/2/2016 5:52 AM, steve robinson wrote:

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On Thu, 2 Jun 2016 21:01:41 -0500, Martin Eastburn

I never said use a crosscut for rip sawing
My information goes back to 1945 a carpentry manual written by JK Mc Kay which i have just pulled off my bookshelf confirms what i have said , i am a highly qualified professional carpenter joiner / cabinet maker of a similar age to yourself , i still use many of the traditional tools , have several disstons hanging on my shop wall, wooden planes infact my pride and joy was a Disstons owned by my grandfather handed down to my uncle who then he gave it to me Saw was manufactured in 1880 , unfortunately some low life stole it along with a boxed set of moulding planes (full set)
I too know what im talking about , i am a Fellow of the institute of carpenters of some 30 years have worked on many historical buildings.
The information is also freely available on several craft web sites.
Disstons was one of the first manufactures to hollow back his saws which allowed for a lighter set giving a far better, more accurate cut .
Steve

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On Thu, 02 Jun 2016 21:01:41 -0500, Martin Eastburn wrote:

Martin,in your initial post in this thread you said:
"Rip saws have teeth that are inline without any set. Wax the saw and let it rip!"
That "without any set" is what prompted the replies. Maybe you meant otherwise, but if not your experience seems lacking :-).
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When you have set the teeth goes side to side. An unset blade the teeth are full width and at most wave or are in line. The hacksaw blade is one example of a wave blade.
The teeth on crosscut are triangles. Have sharp teeth and are not full metal.
The teeth on a rip saw are full width of the blade.
Martin
On 6/3/2016 12:17 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

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On 06/03/2016 9:51 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote: ...

But they're still _set_...
<http://blackburntools.com/articles/saw-tooth-geometry/index.html
Fig. 3
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No way near the set of a set tooth of a crosscut or Gen purpose blade. Just because the whole tooth not a pointed one is shifted slightly doesn't mean it is set. Set teeth alternate and are pointed for sharp cutting of grain. Rip blades chop the grain and slide between strands of the grain on the side of the saw.
Ripping is done in long power strokes. Crosscutting is short and jerky strokes. The pull saw was developed for more control in the crosscut.
Martin
On 6/4/2016 7:48 AM, dpb wrote:

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This is a ridiculous statement. I don't beleive you have ever even used a handsaw.
John
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