Corner Cab - work in progress

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NO you are correct, he absolutely does not mean that.

As Swingman has indicated in the past, we have worked together on a few kitchen projects in the last few years and I have truly learned a few of those tricks that were up his sleeve. I believe when working together that we greatly compliment each other and the results are some very nice kitchens. A good woodworker is always open to learn new ideas and ways to do things.
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And you forgot the most important part Leon. That's the buying of some new tool you've had your eye on.
(How's the Domino working btw?) :)
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wrote in message

It's working great. I am currently working on a couple of jewelry chests using multiple thickness pieces. I ended up buying s4s maple for this project and needed to glue up panels with minimal slipping between the panels and needed to end up with 3/4" thickness and 1/2" when done. I used the Domino more for alignment purposes during the panel glue up. I may have had to remove 1/64" to flatten the panels after the glue up and that worked out just fine.
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"Tanus" wrote

Wow, thanks! Didn't meant to start a lovefest. :)
Do indeed get blown a way when I see top notch work, and just thought I'd mention what I saw yesterday.
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Swingman wrote:

No, I didn't mean to start one either. As others have said, and quite recently, it's often a joy to read the things people put down here. It's also a thrill to see the pictures of what someone's accomplished.
I don't want to be maudlin, nor do I want to embarrass anyone, but I do want to show my appreciation for the contribution that you and many others make to the forum, both in text and webpages.
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"Tanus" wrote

Thank you very much for those kind words! I'm glad you get some use of the site. I enjoy, and benefit from, keeping the webpage updated, it serves a secondary function of helping me overcome CRS these days.
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Swingman said:

OK you guys, get a room.

The party drinks make the mind more amiable to questionable beauty. Seriously. Haven't you ever awakened on a Saturday morning and... Oh well, at least you got blown one way or another.
Greg G.
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I have the stitch marks where they re-attached my arm to prove it.
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A sweaty pile of woodworkers, what an image! <G>
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Well, sitting here with a red face, Thank you Swingman, but as usual your talent for eloquently describing things to sound magnificent has caused a problem with my head, as it has swollen such that I cannot get though the door way. I give all credit to our great long time friends that hosted the party and the excellent choice of music playing in the back ground by the great Linda Lowe.
With that in mind, Swingman being a very good friend is no slouch himself at being able to turn wood into beauty as proven by the many pieces that he has posted on his web site. There are numerous pieces in his home that beg to be touched every time I visit. Furniture can easily look nice but how often dies it call out to be touched? In particular a small walnut entryway table that IIRC resides under a picture of himself dressed up in his "Horse Riding Costume" riding his pony 15 or 20 years ago. ;~) The piece is simply elegant. From there you move further inside his home to the much larger desks, tables, hutches, cabinets, and those 7 chairs which are eye candy to any woodworkers eyes. I would be proud and honored to have any piece of his work in my home. EXCEPT for a copy of a piece that I made which apparently was a bit too complicated for him to duplicate. Sometimes card holders with kick stands can be complicated with confusing angles. ;~) Please ask Swingman to repost the picture of THAT one. LOL
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"Leon" wrote

30 years ago, a 16 hand Thoroughbred hunter, and that's Fox Hunting attire, son. :)
Tally ho!
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I'm looking at the picture of the door frames. Based on the chalked triangles, I assume the rails from each door were ripped from the same piece. Is this to match the grain? Did you consider ripping the two center rail from the same piece instead? The center rails are next to each other where the grain match would be more apparent. The whole cabinet looks great BTW. What finish will you use?
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"MB" wrote

Sorry, I'm confused re "center rails" ... do you mean stiles? The outer face frame stiles of each door was picked to match the grain of the face frame of the actual cabinet, not the door. (watch that camera flash, it plays tricks at an angle).
Stiles were aactually picked primarily for their straightness/flatness, which in the case of doors can be more important that a strict grain match ... nice if you can get it, but a secondary consideration when the wood stash of stock milled in the same batch is getting low.

Thanks ... "Mission Oak" stain (made for Rockler by the Lawrence-McFadden Co, one of the best stains MFGR's around) and an amber shellac top coat, purposely to match other pieces in the same room/suite of furniture.
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What I was after (I didn't ask it clearly,) was, do you use points, silicon, or small wood trim pieces to hold in the glass? I have yet to see an 'elegant' way to do that which doesn't involve hours of making and mounting moulding strips.
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"Robatoy" wrote

On square glass kitchen doors with a single pane and no muntins, I generally use a rabbeted face frame (not dado, sorry) and silicon.
For a piece of furniture, both judiciously applied silicon to stop the rattle, and wood trim, attached with pins.

Since there are gently curved rails at the top of each glass door that mimic the base of the cabinet, I'm undecided which avenue I will take on these glass doors.
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/CornCab20.jpg
If the glass guy can duplicate the slight curve with no problem, I will route a dado after the face frames are glued up; if not, I'll give him a square, routed out area on the back of the top rails that will accept a rectangular piece of glass.
I wish I knew, because I have the bottom doors glued up and drying and I'm twiddling my thumbs as we speak.
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I have used silicon there also. One of the very few times I will tape a silicon job. But it's silicon..I don't think it belongs on furniture. Also, I absolutely hate that shit and in the countertop business, I go through a lot of it, even when scribing to the walls. (They're not straight, you know....<G>)

See? A question, an answer. I always forget I have that pinner. That should do a great job in that application. I'll make a bunch of small trim...cool. Problem solved.

tries to have it work for me...but them Eagles are the epitomy of slick. I have always been a huge Eagles fan, but was leery to try this new CD. I didn't not want to be disappointed. Then I read a review in Rolling Stone magazine which had a line in it which made me go buy it: ===Walsh's "Last Good Time in Town" is a wry cantina-swing sequel to "Life in the Fast Lane" -- staying home apparently is the new going out -- and he cuts through the salsa-lounge grooming with James Gang- era guitar. Seven minutes, though, is a long time to sing about doing fuck-all. ===LOL. As a guy who has worked both sides of the glass in the studio, you'll appreciate the art. Can there be a recording that is 'too well done?"
r
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"Robatoy" wrote

Not on the "recording" end, IMO. It's like wooddorking, you shoot for the moon and hit the top of your Keds, on a good day ... and you can always try to polish at turd/song, providing you can get a firm grasp on the clean end.
I saw an interview with Walsh the other day and it looked interesting ... thanks for the heads-up.
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Swingman said:

Unless you are requesting tempered glass, it quite easy to cut curves in float glass. I know a guy who can freehand it. I can do it with guidelines, and I _know_ you could too. Give him a template or the frame and it should be no problem at all. Besides, curved glass looks so much more eloquent when opeing the door.

I'm waiting on glue to dry... Again...
Greg G.
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"Greg G." wrote

I agree ... and it's so much easier to run a router with a bearing bit and then square up the corners than trying to blind cut stopped dadoes.
Never stopped to think about why, but I have an aversion to working with/handling glass ... simply don't want to touch the stuff, therefore the complete ignorance on the subject.
Pretty much the same way about plumbing ... I can do anything in construction, from foundations to roofing, but I won't even replace a faucet washer without a gun to my head.
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Swingman said:

Would never consider trapping glass in a dado unless one rail unscrewed, but you are right about the bearing bit. The best part is that you have no worries about the corners lining up evenly due to inaccuracies in the positioning of the cuts on the individual sticks. Or something like that...

Odd, considering your breadth of experience; but to each to his own. It's _really_ easy, however. Just watch the edges. You can get thin float glass on a Sunday from the Borg and cut it in minutes. Even knock off the edges with emory cloth and sandblast patterns with a simple thin rubber mask cut with an Xacto knife. All kinds of neat stuff you can do with glass fairly easily. Just not barefooted.

I pass on the foundations due to the degree of humping involved, roofing due to the monotony (and the humping), but electrical and plumbing are OK. But that's me. I can't play the trumpet either. Even with a gun to my head.
Greg G.
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