Corian router tables?

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I bought some large scraps of corian at an auction today. I think one could be used for a great router table top, but I have never heard of anyone doing it; so maybe there is a good reason not to.
Speaking of corian, can it be used as a base for sand paper for sharpening; or is it just not flat enough?
I got 3 pieces 1/2" thick about 36" by 36" and a bunch of sink cutouts for $5.
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toller wrote:

one could

anyone doing

sharpening;
cutouts for

It should make a good router table top, with some edge support. I think the biggest reason it isn't used is because DuPont has made it hard to come by in sizes other than those suitable for turning pens. They claim not to sell to anyone who hasn't taken their course in working and joining the material.
You've got enough to try a piece as a base for sandpaper sharpening. What can you lose? A bit of sandpaper and a little time?
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I think it would be sweet. Go for it.
Barry
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toller wrote: <snip>

You suck!
Congratulations.
It will do a great job for a router table if you back it with some 1/2"-3/4" plywood.
Scuff up one side of the Corian with some 24-36 grit paper, then epoxy to the plywood that has also been sanded with 24-36 grit.
Weight down the plywood with something, even concrete building blocks will work and allow to cure for a few days.
You now have a laminated sandwich that is not only stiff, but bullet proof.
If it were me, I'd trim it to size, then seal the rest of the plywood with more epoxy.
Sand down the first coat with some 80 grit, then recoat with more epoxy.
Your great grand kids will still be using that router table long after you are gone.
Enjoy.
Lew
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Lew, how do you cut corian? Are there special blades? Can you make the cut-out for the router plate with a jig saw? Then clean it up with a router?
Thanks!
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On 17 Apr 2005 09:41:55 -0700, "Never Enough Money"

carbide router bits work well but they dont last as long as with wood.
skeez
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<<how do you cut corian? Are there special blades? Can you make the cut-out for the router plate with a jig saw? Then clean it up with a router?>>
Regular woodworking tools. In my case, I ripped the strips to width on the table saw. I used a Freud laminate cutting blade because I had one handy but I imagine any decent blade would work. I then cut the blanks to exact shape on the bandsaw and fine tuned with a 100 grit belt on my stationary belt sander. I then finished by drilling a few holes with the drill press and the same bits I use for wood. I was originally thinking of using a router with a pattern bit or even a laminate trimming bit but decided my router table wasn't up to the task.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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NEVER use a jigsaw on solid surface. It creates micro-fissures. Cleanup with a router will not get rid of those fissures unless you take off 1-2 inches.... with a router. Rotary cutting action only...sawblade, router bit...
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'Corian' has become a generic name.. like Kleenex. Just make sure it is, in fact, Corian or an acrylic. If it is, it will make a wonderful router table. Mine is made from a product similar to Corian. As long as it is acrylic, it will be strong enough to mount a router onto it.
The polyester based 'look-a-likes' are brittle. You can tell by the smell when you cut/sand it. If it smells like auto-body filler, it's polyester. If it sustains combustion, it is polyester.
Wilsonart Gibraltar (less that 8 years old), Samsung Staron, Avonite (Formstone series only), Dovae, HiMacs and Meganite are all acrylics. The differences in composition between those brands would be difficult for a chemist to establish; differences too small to matter. Any of the above make great router-bases as well.
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wrote:

Thank. They actually say "Corian" on them. BTW they also sold boxes of 2" long 8" diameter corian tubes with a slit in them. They went for almost nothing. What the heck are they used for?
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My hunch is that they were Dani Clamps. They're PVC and used to apply minimal pressure when gluing up edges on counter tops.
http://www.daniclamp.com/miscphoto/c06.jpg
Most spring clamps apply too much pressure, starving the joints.... or so they claim. I have never had an edge fall off. I have over 300 of these Pony 3202 clamps, no problems.
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Actually most manufacturers of acrylic router plates do not recomend leaving a router hanging when not in use. The plate, mine that was 3/8" thick bowed from the weight of a router in about 6 months. It did just fine for the first 4 years but after changing to an apparently heavier router it bowed downward.
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I had one made of plywood with a thin (1/4") layer of some kind of solid surfacing laminated on top. It worked much better than my current one with a laminate top, but it was just a top and building a permanent base was too much work compared to buying a new one.
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Speaking of the whole flat enough enigma, I don't know the answer to the question but there is an easy way to tell. Take a fairly thick piece of plate glass or a surface plate if you can get access to one. Cover the plate with some sort of liquid paint such as oil paint (usually prussian blue is used). Then lay the corian down on the glass or plate and rub it around. Then lift it off and turn it over. If the paint or ink formed a fairly even coat on the corian, it is fairly flat. If the ink or paint is patchy, then it isn't very flat. If you are ambitious and the corian isn't flat, you can try to flatten it by simply sanding or scaping down the areas covered with paint until the whole piece is fairly evenly coated. This is the same method used for flattening nearly any tool, such as plane soles. If you are interested, go into google and search on "lapping plane soles"
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woodworker88 wrote:

Not quite. Prussian Blue marking paste is not "oil paint", it's purpose made for this task and if it dries at all it does so very slowly. Go to Mcmaster <http://www.mcmaster.com and search on "prussian blue"--a tube is about 3 bucks.
While oil paint could probably work for the task, it's not really made for it and given the low price of the right stuff it seems silly not to use it.
In any case, if you care about the appearance, test first and make sure you can get whatever you use _off_ before you get it on wide areas of the Corian.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
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Assuming you don't plan to make your router table top the full 3' x 3', be sure to save some of the trimmings to make into zero clearance inserts for your table saw. The 1/2 thick scraps are ideal for this purpose.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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Sound great.
The only problem I see is coming up with matching accessories for you new, fancy router table top. After all, you have to color match that fancy top with everything!
At least that is what the SWMBO would do. :)
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Well, of course that's what happens when you let SWMBO in your workshop. A thinking guy would try to prevent that because she would see new tools magically appearing on regular intervals in your shop. That's a no-no, to be avoided at any cost.
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wrote in message

Well, the good news is she either didn't recognize the new lathe in the corner there, or chose not to say anything to me about it. Maybe a new quilter's sewing machine is on order??
Patriarch
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Don't the prices of some of those things cost more than a decent lathe? Sounds to me that it would be cheaper for you to negotiate one of those sewing machines for her and balance it with a bigger machine for yourself.
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