Corian question


I have rough cut 8 Corian blanks for TS ZC inserts. Problem is, I need them less than 1/2" thick. My idea is to run them through my planer (Delta 22-580) taking very light passes with the spent blades that are currently installed, then flip the double-edge blades afterward.
Is it a bad idea to run Corian through a planer? Could it damage the planer, the blades, or me? Anyone done this? TIA for any advice.
Sidney
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If you have to do it, don't use spent blades; use nice sharp ones. Think about it; if the material is particularly tough, do you want to go at it with dull blades?
I have a pile of 1/2" corian blanks I picked up for nothing at an auction. (Guy bought an enormous pile of blanks and sheets for $100. He told me to take what I wanted since he didn't know how he was going to get it home anyhow, so I took 3 nice sheets and 10 blanks.) Never thought of using them for zcis. Certainly more stable than wood...
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If you do, don't cut them to length until you've reached final thickness, as they'll be too short for a safe passage through the planer. Let us know how it turns out, eh? Tom
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Use them full thickness, but rabbet the edges down to the required size. If your arbor won't drop down enough for your sawblade to clear to cut the new insert, start the zc cut with an 8" or 7 1/4" blade.
IF you're going to put them through the planer, make sure the blades are sharp. Should the piece of Corian decide to break up in the planer, it can/will cause lots of damage. It is not recommended.
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How much do you need to thin them down? It might be better to use a belt sander.
Lee
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Hey, thanks for all the great advice. I only need to take off about 1/16", so I'll go with Robatoy's suggestion and rabbet the edges. I can easily do this with a staight bit in my router table w/ fence. It makes more sense to cut Corian with carbide anyway. Thanks again, all.
Sid
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Oh, and before I forget, make sure the edges are sanded smooth so there won't be any fissures from sawblades, etc where cracks can start.
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Upon further reflection:
It may therefore be wise to terminate the slot that you'll be cutting with your sawblade, with a drilled hole (1/4"?) on each end of the slot as a stress-relief, in order to prevent cracks from developing there. Kinda like: 0==============0
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 09:51:51 -0400, "Sidney"

I wouldn't use Corian for an insert.
It can crack and send sharp stuff heading your way.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
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Even though Corian is pretty tough stuff, that possibility does exist.
I use Baltic birch ply fore my ZCI.
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Tom Watson wrote:

Tom,
The brittleness problem hadn't occurred to me. Thanks for the reality check. Time to go to plan B.
Sid
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