cordless drills, power difference between cheap and half decent?

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Serious. According to the AT&T phone features the higher Gig rating of 5.8 having a higher frequency than 2.8 travels better through and around obstacles therefore in turn tends to travel farther by comparison. They only have the higher frequency on the out going or in coming, I do not recall which is which. Apparently at times you are when farther from the base either you will not be able to hear the caller or he will not be able to hear you.
Basically AT&T claims longer range through obstacles with the 5.8 over the 2.8. Either way this set of phones have always worked like they are hard wired regardless of where I have used them. Our earlier 900 megahertz AT&T phones with the longer antennas did not work as well, all things being equal.
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Actually the higher gigahertz phones are of newer, most often better, design. The waiter could have stated it more eloquently if that is what was said.
Steve
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For what it's worth. All of my reading on the subject is absolutely positively in agreement with your opinion. Apparently there is a great positive difference between an impact driver and an ordinary drill, for driving screws. Anybody who has any doubt about that should just do a little shopping for impact drivers and read the reviews.
Have fun.
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Patriarch wrote:

Both the original & the replacement cells were nicad, only difference was capacity. I agree there have been technological changes in these cells, but to compare it to what has taken place with computers in the same period is way overblown.
Dan
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But the thought got your attention, didn't it? Look more closely at what has happened with battery life, charge cycles, and importantly, weight requirements.
You're on Usenet, so you are at least some level of computer geek. ;-)
I bought 12v tools, because they work well for me, and were much less expensive for the same levels of build quality. Very seldom do the batteries need recharging before I do. And I do these things for the fun of it...
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

I'm still not sure price point for price point the drills of today offer that much functional superiority over those of a decade ago, not that I've done an A B comparison (if such a test exists, I'm sure someone here will point it out) but the nickel metal hydride cells at least remove a source of toxic cadmium from landfills. NiMH cells do have greater capacity size for size, I just think most makers use such crappy cells to start with to save $$$ (and reap $$$ selling replacement cells), it may not amount to much in actual use. Also they don't tend to use the best charging technology. The charger for my old Skil, as with most nicad units, relied on the temperature of the pack to determine a full charge, a crude method that's hard on the cells. I haven't taken the cover off my Makita charger, but I'd be surprised if it was all that much more sophisticated. We can agree on a preference for the lower voltages. One reason I like my new 14.4v Makita is it's small & (especially) relatively LIGHT! The heft of those 18 & 24 volt monsters 'bout breaks my arm, especially with my "painter's elbow" (same thing as tennis elbow, only I got it PAINTING! ;-/ )
Dan
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You're not just waiting for the new 60 volt drills? They'll come complete with backpack to carry the batteries.

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CW wrote:

BACKPACK! Why that's absurd! All they have to do is have the batteries in a convenient CARRYING CASE, then run a nice CORD to the drill, that way you'd...
Hey, wait a minute!!!!
;-)
Dan
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LOL!

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Apparently lithium-ion batteries are okay too.

Apparently that's the rule for lots of manufactured cordless devices. The only common retail NiMHs are 1.2 V AA batteries, the larger namebrand C and D NiMH cells are just padded AAs.
Nickel metal hydrides aren't hazardous, they hold lots more electricity, and they don't have memory effects like NiCads. The AA NiMHs you can buy locally are still rapidly improving. Duracell just started selling 2650 milliamp hour AA rechargeable NiMHs, that's about double the capacity of when they first came on the market.
Apparently lithium-ion batteries can be recharged twice as many times as NiCad or NiMH, and do not fade near the end of their charge.

Hmm. I thought current and/or voltage monitoring was common.

The lithium-ion chargers are more sophisticated, maybe because they can blow up if not handled with care.
Have fun.

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snipped-for-privacy@usenetlove.invalid says...

Sadly the NiMH also have a curve of diminishing returns. I have a 12V Panasonic that came with 2@4Ah NiMH batteries. Had it for maybe 4 years now. 1 battery no longer takes more than 5 mins worth of charge, the other still works but self- discharges within about a week. Beautiful machine otherwise; I like the very sleek older 9.6 I have even better. I had the battery pack for that one rebuilt with NiMH.

Drawback with li-ion is the limited lifespan. After nnn days they die, never mind how you've used them. There are/were also constraints on current possibly cooking them - I believe this is being improved rapidly. Considering what I said above: so what ;-)
I am looking forward to this technology getting cheaper and more robust. We now have walkie talkies with Li-ion batteries and I like them MUCH better than the ones I had before with NiMH. Lighter, more compact, and they're always in the charger - 24/7, when not in use.
-P.
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As far as I know, NiCad and NiMH both last about 1000 charges, eventually they all die.
I started buying AA NiMH batteries many years ago, about one year after they came onto the market. I still have them all, about 18 (plus about 8 AAAs). They are many different capacities since the capacity keeps improving about 200 milliamp hours every six months. The only concern I'm familiar with is that multiple cell NiMH devices can conceivably be damaged if they appear to be discharged completely but some are still slightly charged. I guess that's a good reason to fully charge them before installation. I haven't noticed any degradation here.

Replaced the embedded AA NiCad with NiMH in my electric toothbrush... much better :)

That would be very bad news for millions of laptop computer users.

As far as I know, their lifespan is very roughly 2000 recharges.

I think lithium-ion batteries being safer is a major design problem also, like with the recent laptop recall.

Model airplane enthusiasts like them (see rec.models.rc.air), but that's probably high-risk for fire/explosion.
They are being used in some new cordless drills.

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NiMH batteries.

If you techies want to know how Lithium cells are controlled, check out this site.
http://www.panasonic.com/industrial/battery/oem/chem/lithion/i ndex.html
Battery packs (Li-Ion) now have microchips in them for control of over current/voltage, in both the charge and discharge mode.
Makes it hard to get your battery packs rebuilt, because each manuafacturer has it's own charcteristics for the cells, plus they can turn off (via the microchip, timed number of charge/discharge cycles) the control circuits when they think you've had enough use out of your battery pack.
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All current batteries that I am aware of are considered "consumables" as it were and are expected to wear out, (though may well be covered by warranty in many cases.)
Notice the little battery recycling kiosk thingie in many of the power tool stores?
Steve
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snipped-for-privacy@sellcom.com wrote in
<snip>

At least in Kalifornia, that's due to the hazardous waste efforts of the Republic, trying to keep our landfills cleaner...
Patriarch, never quite certain of the real motives, though.
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