Cordless Drill Voltage Why so many?

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I think most batteries in the 14.4v and up range would last more than 30 minutes screwing deck screws.
The tradeoff in cordless is weight vs capacity and increased torque. I found that the 14.4v Makita was a reasonable balance of these factors (though my hand is smaller so the 18v gets heavy faster than for you he-men).
I find cordless are easier for screws because of the low end torque vs the harder to control for screws corded models. Can be done, but so much easier with a cordless. Haven't tried a dedicated screw gun (corded) for something like deck screws but they sure are sweet for drywall. Plus, the dang cord isn't always in your way.
Might want to consider predrilling your holes - makes it lots easier. Corded fine here.
Renata
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I've had 12V Makitas and Bosches, but I use 18V DeWalts now. Heavier, but makes everything go faster for me. I'll keep using 'em until I can't carry a big drill.
GTO(John)

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jm wrote:

For general around the hose, shop etc a 14.4 Volt is what I use...
I just finished a dec this spring and I did use an 18 V cordless BUT most of the deck work was accomplished with an extension cord and a regular 1/2 in electric drill...just faster lighter and easier to use...(with the exception of the cord that is)...
Bob Griffiths
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Too many choices!!! I've a Craftsman 14.4 I bought on sale and love it. Built my 12x16 shop using it - in part. No problem driving in 3" screws when necessary - plenty of power. Anything longer than that and I'd get an inexpensive elec drill though. They have more cojones!
jm wrote:

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A lot of the various voltages are curtesy "Tim the Tool Man" marketing -- "More Power". Before too long someone will come out with a 110volt drill and sing the praises of not having to stop and recharge it.
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I like 9.6v for assembly work in the shop. I like 14.4v for carpentry. Yes, higher voltage (more power) is nice, but the tradeoff is the weight of the tool.
Most important for your deck building is two battery packs and a one hour charger.
Rich S.
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Yes,
Every tool has its place. At work, a couple of guys bought 18V drills and use them to change some name plates in aluminum tooling. I'm talking 12-32 screws. After two uses, they are forbidden to use them and must use the 3.6 volt B & D screwdriver that has yet to strip the threads. Ed
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I don't understand why they were "forbidden?"
wrote in message >

the
12-32
3.6
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Didn't the phrase "strip the threads" catch your eye there? The bozos using them evidently forgot they had clutches and the management evidently wanted to slow the work down and make it more threadsafe. ;)
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wrote:

Basically the higher the voltage the more power and the longer it will last on a single charge. Keeping that in mind I have yet to find anything that beats good ole corded drills.
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Thanks. I don't know why a cordless is better in a shop where the electricity is right there. Maybe someone else can enlighten me. But I do see Norm Abram using one in his shop AND HE IS THE MAN.
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They are just more portable if you are moving around a large piece driving screws. You are not tripping over the cord. I very seldom actually drill with my cordless. It always has a bit driver adapter in it. I use a more powerful corded drill for drilling the hole and I run in the screw with the cordless. Sometimes I will even have 3 drills out.
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the
Corded doesn't have a clutch? Why wouldn't they build that in?
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Good question. Drills are meant to drill and cordless machines are really screwdrivers, I guess. I can't imagine a cordless that would be able to shoot holes for Tapcons and have a battery you would want to carry. If I am doing light duty drilling or shooting screws I grab a cordless. If I want to drill some serious holes I plug into the grid.
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I had the same idea but in a moment of laziness (and having only a couple holes that needed to be made) I grabbed the 18v Milwaukee cordless and drilled into brick without a problem. Smallish hole (~1/4 - 3/8") and nice sharp bit, but I was nevertheless surprised - thought it would take more effort. No hassle at all. Cordless today seem to handle well beyond light duty hole drilling. Now, if you've got a bunch of holes to drill (into masonry), then I'd certainly take the time to set up a corded hammer drill.
Renata
On 09 Sep 2003 01:47:10 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comGreg (Gfretwell) wrote: --snip--

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I have never seen one with a clutch. Not a feature because it would probably take sales from the drills that are the most profitable. The cordless drills are basically free in a kit and you buy the 2 batteries and charger. 3 years ago I bought a new drill kit because the kit with 2 batteries was 3 or 4 dollars more than 2 batteries by themselves. The batteries poop out and you buy more batteries. Not totally unlike cheap printers that come with the tiny and expensive ink refills .
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I've seen a couple - Ryobi comes to mind - low end drill, though.
Mike
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if you watch his older shows, you will see him with a corded drill.
But

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